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Audi A3 Sedan Gets US Green Light, Q3 Still Pending

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Audi presented at the 2011 Geneva Auto Show the new A3 sedan concept that's said to preview the future generation A3 and, as far as the German manufacturer is concerned, it is on the right track to become a global product. A report by Automotive News reveals that Audi will most likely bring the A3 sedan in the United States in 2013, but the Q3 crossover that will debut in Europe later this year is still in doubt.

Peter Schwarzenbauer, Audi AG board member for sales and marketing, says executives within the German manufacturer are still talking on the possibility to launch the Q3 in the United States but even if the car receives the approval to go on sale there, this won't happen sooner than 12 to 15 months.

The A3 on the other hand will most likely step on American soil very soon, but only in sedan form. The grand debut is expected to take place in 2013, when it will take the place of the low selling A3 that's currently available in the country.

"If you look at this specific segment around the world, you come to the conclusion that this car is designed -- but it is not yet decided -- with the U.S. and China in mind," Schwarzenbauer said. "These are two markets where the segment is quite big."

The A3 concept displayed in Switzerland came with a five-cylinder engine, coupled with a 7-speed S tronic transmission, generating 408 hp from a displacement of 2.5 liters. Its peak torque of 500 Nm (369 lb-ft) is available over a broad rev range between 1,600 and 5,300 rpm. This allows the car to accelerate to 100 km/h (62.14 mph) in 4.1 seconds, up to an electronically limited top speed of 250 km/h (155.34 mph).
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About the author: Bogdan Popa
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Bogdan keeps an eye on how technology is taking over the car world. His long-term goals are buying an 18-wheeler because he needs more space for his kid’s toys, and convincing Google and Apple that Android Auto and CarPlay deserve at least as much attention as their phones.
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