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Aston Martin Lineup To Be Electrified By Mid-2020s

Volvo will offer an electrified lineup by 2019, Jaguar will rely on hybrid and electric powertrains from 2020, and Aston Martin plans to follow suit by the mid-2020s. That doesn’t mean the V12 and driver enjoyment are dead, though. Far from it, in fact.
Aston Martin RapidE 31 photos
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As per chief executive officer Andy Palmer, the focus is on hybridization in the first instance. By 2030, Automotive News reports that “a quarter of the company’s cars will be fully electric.” A first step in this direction will be made in 2019, when the RapidE electric sedan is scheduled to go into production.

Production is limited to 155 examples, and what we know about the RapidE is that it will employ Williams Advanced Engineering, all-wheel-drive, and will be good for more than 200 miles (320 km) on a charge. The electric sedan has some big shoes to fill, with the Rapide AMR priding itself as the world's fastest sedan thanks to a V12-powered top speed of 210 miles per hour (338 km/h).

In the long run, Aston Martin plans to develop hybrid and electric technology in-house, the benefit being independence technical partner and shareholder Daimler. As far as the hybrid scene is concerned, the DBX crossover will be made available with this sort of powertrain. A PHEV, however, won’t happen.

Being a relatively small automaker with limited cash in the coffer, Aston Martin won’t have it easy transitioning from internal combustions to eco-friendly alternatives. But as luxury vehicles and sports cars keep getting faster thanks to hybridization and electrification, turning the company around is the way to go if Aston Martin doesn’t want to be left behind by the competition.

Even the heavily-anticipated Valkyrie hypercar relies on a hybrid battery system developed by Rimac. The system works together with the naturally aspirated V12, helping the engine with KERS-like get-up-and-go. The Formula 1-inspired technology shouldn’t come as a surprise considering the Valkyrie is co-developed with the help of RBR technical officer Adrian Newey.

 
 
 
 
 

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