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Amatoya: the Fire-Fighting Concept

The Amatoya is a concept portraying the fire-fighting vehicle of the near future. It is designed by Liam Fergurson and it seems to be inspired from one of the army’s trusty workhorses’ layout, resembling a Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicle. Its design is function dictated, allowing the vehicle to access calamity sites much faster than the heavy conventional fire trucks.

The idea is remarkable although we’re not so sure of its applicability. We think it would be better if those two water cannons were adapted to shoot paint balls. Recreational warfare simulation tactics would be changed forever.

Autoevolution even has an automotive label for the Amatoya: TUV. It stands for True Utility Vehicle, whatever the vehicle’s canons shoot.

Here’s the designer’s view of his creation :

RECONNAISSANCE
“Currently the role of site reconnaissance is predominantly carried out by light tankers or QAVs (Quick Attack Vehicles), typically these are modified single cabin commercial utility vehicles such as the Toyota Landcruiser. While the off road performance and maneuverability of such a vehicle is sufficient, its ability to actively suppress a fire threat is severely limited by the considerably small water supply (500lt) and distinct lack of survival engineering, fundamentally making it inadequate for its role.”

CREW LAYOUT                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Typically medium and heavy tankers require 5-6 crew members to be operated effectively. AMATOYA requires only 2. More military in its approach, reducing crew numbers per appliance will allow for greater dispersion of resources during a fire response.

SURVIVABILITY
Cabin temperature and vehicle survivability are central to the AMATOYA concept. Existing approaches in survival engineering on fire tankers consistently appears as augmentation rather than integration. Methods are passive, typically reactive and often incapacitate the appliance when in use. A key example is the use of curtain heat shields, while effective, when employed render the appliance out of operation.
To create a homogeneous directive towards survivability AMATOYA incorporates state of the art clear aerogel laminated insulation in the windows and bodywork, a dedicated auxiliary water supply to operate a highly efficient, intelligent temperature controlled spray down system, military grade sacrificial thermo ceramic intumescent paints, and a mechanically injected large displacement diesel engine specifically engineered for the unique conditions experienced on the fire ground.

SUPPRESSION ABILITY
A Remotely Operated Suppression Cannon Outfit (ROSCO) coupled with a generous 1800lt + 400lt auxiliary water supply, offers a unique dynamic to vehicle operation. Current suppression techniques require large crew numbers (at least 5 per appliance) to perform through intermittent periods of strenuous labor to have any form of impact on a fire.

OFF ROAD PERFORMANCE
AMATOYA represents the pinnacle of specialized performance in the fire appliance design field. Off road capabilities reflect enthusiast 4WD methods, including generous approach, departure and over ramp angles, suspension travel, ground clearance and minimized turn circle.
Central tire inflation (CTI) and run flat tire (RFT) technology coupled with beadlock tires will allow an extensive band of dynamic pressure control to aid in traversing the complex terrain often encountered on the fire ground.

MANUFACTURING
The vehicle adopts many conventional fabrication techniques associated with low production run specialized vehicles. The point of difference which separates this concept from existing appliances is the proposed monocoque steel body, comparable to military MRAP vehicles. A conventional fire tanker is built body-on-frame from a standard cab chassis truck base. While this approach is successful, the lack of integration results in certain performance issues. Body roll due to the on board water supply is an notable problem, however by creating a fully integrated solution, water reservoirs can be strategically located central and low in the vehicle to dramatically improve the center of gravity.


 
 
 
 
 

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