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All Your Favorite Robots Are Ready for the Holidays and Want to Spread the Christmas Cheer

With Christmas just around the corner, the internet is once again invaded by the holiday-themed videos we’re all so familiar with. But if you’re tired of looking at your fellow humans wishing you a "Merry Christmas!" and a "Happy New Year!", keep on reading.
Robots wishing a "Merry Christmas!" 7 photos
Robots wishing you a "Merry Christmas!"Robots wishing you a "Merry Christmas!"Robots wishing you a "Merry Christmas!"Robots wishing you a "Merry Christmas!"Robots wishing you a "Merry Christmas!"Robots wishing you a "Merry Christmas!"
Some of the most popular robots on the market right now are ready to make your day and get you all hyped up for the holidays and full of Christmas cheer. A team of inspired researchers from the Faculty of Electrical Engineering at the Czech Technical University (CTU) in Prague shared an adorable video on YouTube, in which robots wish us “Merry Christmas!” for a change.

They gathered some of the most famous machines of the moment to appear in the hilarious production. You might be able to recognize some of the “faces” in the clip, as two of the stars are Spot machines developed by Boston Dynamics.

The yellow robot dog is not at its first performance. In fact, you can see it showing off its dance moves on a constant basis. It’s been just a month since it flaunted its artistic skills in the “Spot Me Up” video, offering its own take on the legendary “Start Me Up” song from The Rolling Stones. It also danced alongside the famous boy band BTS back in June and wished everyone a “Happy New Year!” in 2020 with an impressive choreography on the “Do You Love Me?” hit from The Contours.

Back to CTU’s recently shared video, the Spot robots are joined by many other impressively skilled machines. There’s also the balancing robot SK80, developed in-house by graduate students at the Czech Technical University, which can balance on its two legs with wheels and move around autonomously.

The Ludvik LEGO humanoid robot is also present. It was built of more than 30,000 LEGO pieces, also by the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, and is able to play Beethoven’s compositions on the electric keyboard like there’s no tomorrow.

Watch the entire fleet of robots getting ready for the holidays in the video below.



 
 
 
 
 

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