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All-Original 1970 Pontiac GTO Spent 20 Years in a Coma, Is Still Breathing

Cars sitting for decades can hide all kinds of surprises, especially if they’ve been sitting under the clear sky, which most often means the body is very close to becoming a full wreck.
1970 Pontiac GTO 15 photos
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On the other hand, a vehicle stored inside in a climate-controlled garage can end up quite a show car, especially if it retains most of the original parts installed when it rolled off the assembly lines. The 1970 Pontiac GTO that we have here is more or less a mix of these two scenarios.

First and foremost, let’s start with the basics. It’s a 1970 Pontiac GTO that hasn’t moved for approximately two decades. As the owner explains on Craigslist, the car has been left sitting in the same place some 20 miles (32 km) away from the beach.

For car aficionados out there, the beach part is definitely concerning, as we all know what humidity does to metal. And as it turns out, this GTO has also become a victim of the invasion of rust, though if we are to trust the seller, the floors and the undersides are still in good shape.

Of course, there’s some rust here and there, including on the driver’s quarter panel, so if you’re interested in buying this GTO, you should definitely inspect everything closer to figure out if rust has taken its toll on other parts as well.

The engine under the hood is the original 400 that came with the GTO, and while this is the good news, there’s also some bad news. The engine no longer starts, although it turns over by hand, so it’s not stuck from sitting. The engine has already been rebuilt before the GTO ended up in storage, so in theory, it shouldn’t require too many fixes to start.

As for how much this GTO actually costs, the seller says anyone willing to pay $8,900 would be free to take it home, though some other trades, including RVs, would be considered.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party

 
 
 
 
 

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