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All-Original 1961 Lincoln Continental Convertible Pulled from a Barn Is Here to Impress

Lincoln started the production of the Continental convertible on November 1, 1960, with the company eventually manufacturing only a little over 25,100 units.
1961 Lincoln Continental 19 photos
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The 4-door sedan ended up becoming the most common choice, as it accounted for more than 22,300 units, while the convertible was a lot rarer with just 2,850 cars. Few people know this, but the 1961 model year also included a hardtop version of the Continental, but only 4 units got to see the daylight.

1961 was also the first year for the center-opening rear doors, but at the same time, it was also the first year for the four-door convertible. So its sales weren’t necessarily a big disappointment, especially as this configuration was still new to the market.

This 1961 Lincoln Continental is one of the few convertibles still around today, and in case you’re wondering how come it’s still alive today, the answer comes from a barn in Connecticut. The car was parked in hiding for the last years, with eBay seller marin1102 claiming the vehicle continues to be drivable today.

In other words, the 430 V8 (7.0-liter) engine under the hood is still in a good shape, though we don’t know if it requires any fixes or not. This was the only engine choice available in the United States, while the export models were fitted with a low-compression version of the same unit.

This Continental certainly looks great for a car this old, and there’s a good chance it has never been restored. Unfortunately, it’s hard to tell if any parts are missing, but on the other hand, the seller claims everything is still original, therefore adding value to a potential full restoration.

The bidding is underway as we speak, and so far, the auction has already received close to 20 offers. The top bid at the time of writing is a little over $4,000, but with some 3 days left until the digital battle comes to an end, there’s a chance the price goes up a little bit.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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