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All-New Range Rover Evoque II Spied for the First Time as Test Mule

Production of the Range Rover Evoque started just three years after Tata bought JLR from Ford. At first, it was said that this entry-level model was only designed to appeal to women and to lower CO2 emissions for the entire range.
All-New Range Rover Evoque II Spied for the First Time as Test Mule 10 photos
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Many cars with similar agendas failed badly, but it soon became apparent that the Evoque was the right car at the right time. It's by far the most popular model made by Land Rover and a huge source of revenue.

Even after six years, it's still very desirable. But there might be one problem that could hurt it going forward - the Evoque is now less practical than some premium hatchbacks. Development has thus started on a Mk2 Evoque, which has just been spied for the first time in test mule form.

Our pictures suggest the new Evoque will be built on a new platform with wider tracks. The car's wheelbase is unchanged, but they could play with the rear overhang later in the development cycle.

Peaking under the prototypes skirts, we see that it's using a completely redesigned trailing arm suspension setup. Much like rival German manufacturers, Land Rover is also going to tuck the exhaust underneath the bumper rather than giving it visible tips. The "high voltage" sticker on the back suggests one of three things is happening. Either this prototype is a hybrid, it's got a 48V setup or is a fully electric vehicle, which is much more likely.

So far, the Brits haven't said a single thing about the Evoque. However, we know that Jaguar is making the small E-Pace model right now, so the two might share a platform. Likewise, we assume the reboot of the entry-level Range Rover will incorporate JLR’s latest four-cylinder gasoline and diesel Ingenium engines.

Then again, if the current Evoque is built on a modified Freelander 2 platform then the successor will swap parts with the Discovery Sport. The crossover is expected to debut during the second half of next year, giving us plenty of time to figure things out.

 
 
 
 
 

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