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Alfa Romeo SUV Mule Spied, Production Model Should Come Mid-2016

With not that much time left until 2018 and only one of the eight new models announced to show for, Alfa Romeo is busy testing the remaining seven members of the future lineup.
Alfa Romeo SUV test mule 10 photos
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Next in line is the all-important SUV, which for the moment only goes by the internal name 949. As long as it won't bear a girl's name like the newly revealed Giulia sedan, everything should be OK.

Not much is know about the future SUV even though we're not that far away from the mid-2016 planned release, which means Alfa Romeo is doing a good job of keeping its development secret.

These latest spyshots show us a mule testing the SUV's chassis under what appears to be a modified Fiat 500L body. And by "modified" we mean heavily extended.

After investing close to 2.2 billion dollars in developing the new modular platform and powertrains, it would make sense for the Alfa Romeo SUV to use a modified version of the one underpinning the Giulia sedan. In case you forgot, that layout comes with rear-wheel drive that should make for a sport-oriented SUV, should it prove to be true.

The engine in the QV Giulia is expected to make its way onto the new SUV as well, so there might be rough times ahead for the likes of BMW X3 M or Mercedes-AMG GLC. We remind you that on the Giulia sedan, the twin-turbo V6 - that has some ties with a little brand called Ferrari - develops 503hp (510 PS) and sounds terrific.

So it's all down to how the new car will look and how well it will be marketed. Alfa Romeo has a 400,000 sales target for 2018, which would be an incredible jump from the mere 74,000 registered throughout 2013. But the brand is going through a relaunching phase and everything that happened these past few years should be left exactly where it is: behind.

Alfa Romeo is also planning a return Stateside and is actually hanging a lot of its hopes on this: of those hypothetical 400,000 units sold in 2018, 150,000 of them are scheduled for the American market.

I don't know about you, but I would like to wish Alfa Romeo all the luck in the world. As long as it keeps its identity and doesn't get swollen into the big FCA happy family.

 
 
 
 
 

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