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Airbus Challenge Entry A100 MND Is a Drone That Could Compete Against Amazon
Let’s face it. Since the beginning of the worldwide health crisis, everyone has been sitting around the house with package after package delivered to their door.

Airbus Challenge Entry A100 MND Is a Drone That Could Compete Against Amazon

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For some time now, Airbus has been hosting an event known as the Cargo Drone Challenge. One entry by Arthur Murcia, a designer from Sao Paulo, Brazil, shows the world a concept that goes beyond a simple rendering.

Most concepts receive no more than just a visual representation of what they could ultimately be, but whenever you look to present an idea to a group like Airbus, you better have more than just a picture. The A100 MND drone you see here is an example of a project worthy of handling your packages, and then so much more.

Beyond just the rendering you see, the designer explored all aspects of a full-functioning vessel. Details regarding wingspan, lift propeller diameters and lift area, and even the number of propellers needed to successfully maneuver the craft were explored. The fuselage length, structural mass, and electric motor weight and output are also considered. Not one aspect has been overlooked.

Looking through the images provided on the designer’s Behance page, you can tell how much thought went into the project as it includes schematics for absolutely every component used in the MND’s construction. The placement of antennas, communications systems, engines, cargo bay, and everything else you see includes a blown-up building map showing the exact positioning of each component. But why?

The MND is to be delivered to your door and assembled on-site in around an hour's time. The designer even took the time to develop is the delivery system with which you’ll receive your drone if you ever order one— or a few hundred, assuming you run a parcel delivery service.

You can see a dome at the front of the drone that includes an array of sensors and cameras needed to successfully maneuver through town. All sensors and cameras are housed in a three-axle rotation globe that allows the MND to see in all directions.

Four engines are found powering the MND, each one found in the hub of its respective rotor. With a wingspan of 4.0 meters (13.12 feet) and an unloaded mass of 20.345 kg (44.85 lbs), the drone can carry a payload of 4.7 kg (10.36 lbs).

In the center of the body, but on top, is where you’ll be able to find the battery pack for this device. To remove the battery pack, in case you need to charge it off-site, all you've got to do is press a button found behind the pack, and out it goes.

One aspect that is not mentioned is the MND's battery power and range. When you think about it, that’s a bit difficult to gauge as there are a few variables to consider, including package weight, which will fluctuate greatly from one delivery to the next.

Now, aside from just being a delivery service, the designer also thought of a couple more uses for the MND. The first is a classic surveillance drone where the cargo bay now includes more cameras and sensors that could be used to identify a diverse range of objects and objectives.

The final use is that of a medic support drone. Here, the cargo bay is still in use but is to be filled with supplies needed for several medical duties, possibly even an AED (Automated External Defibrillator).

With such a diverse number of modes and sheer amount of detail given to the design, I feel it won’t be long until Airbus itself comes out with something like this, if it hasn’t already.

 
 
 
 
 

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