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Abandoned After Divorce: 1968 Plymouth Barracuda Sitting for 32 Years, Seeking New Home

Whoever planned to buy a Barracuda back in 1968 had to choose from a wide range of engine options, starting with the 225 (3.7-liter) slant six.
1968 Plymouth Barracuda 16 photos
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It goes without saying this wasn’t necessarily the top choice for people particularly interested in the performance side of the Barracuda, but at the end of the day, it served its purpose just right. With this 225, the Barracuda was more or less a good-looking grocery-getter, and for many customers, this made perfect sense.

Rough estimates indicate that Plymouth built over 46,000 Barracudas for this model year, and close to 29,000 units came with V8 engines. The rest of them were fitted with six-cylinder units, so finding one today shouldn’t by any means be mission impossible.

One of these six-cylinder 1968 Barracudas is right here, trying to find a new home after previously being moved to long-term storage back in 1990.

eBay seller drivelineworks says the car was abandoned after the owner got divorced, and despite sitting for over three decades, it still comes in a condition that seems to allow for an easy restoration.

Unsurprisingly, the rust has already invaded part of the metal, and the trunk and floor pans seem to require major patches. A respray is also required, but the seller insists the body is completely original, with no modifications or repaints whatsoever.

Certainly, the six-cylinder engine under the hood could make some buyers walk away, but while this Barracuda isn’t a Formula S, it could easily qualify for a restomod if another big-block unit is in the house. The car seems to tick just the right boxes for such a project, though the main roadblock appears to be the selling price.

The owner expects to get no more, no less than $8,500 for their project, and given this is a very ambitious expectation, it’s really not a surprise that the listing is likely to expire without anyone willing to pay that much.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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