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A Porsche 911 Plug-In Hybrid Might Be Coming, but No Sooner than 2020

As the CO2 emission problem has become crucial in recent years and more carmakers are developing or already having hybrid technology in their cars, Porsche says it will do the same for the next-gen 911, and is preparing a plug-in hybrid version that will hit the market somewhere around 2020.
2017 Porsche 911 Turbo 24 photos
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A lot of statements from the carmakers’ key people are still surfacing from the North American International Auto Show. It’s Erhard Mossle's turn, Porsche 911 Turbo's engineering boss, to reveal pieces of information, as he has confirmed to Autocar that work has begun on a plug-in version of the 911, but “It takes time to bring something like this to market. With the packaging problems of the car, there are a lot of things to solve before then.”

Perhaps the biggest problem is to find the amount of space necessary for the battery pack to fit on the rear-engined 911, and then there is the issue of its mass. The Porsche official acknowledges his team is working to reduce the next generation’s weight, but says it is rather difficult because large amounts of carbon fiber can’t be used due to both cost and the fact that the 911 is produced in high volumes.

For some parts, you can substitute a carbon fiber part, like the floor or the rear seat section. But that’s the future, it’s not decided now,“ he also said.

Mossle admits that Porsche will remain faithful to the flat-six engine, one of the brand’s most important signatures, because “There is still a lot of potential to reduce consumption and CO2 emissions further. As much as I think we will need to.

Porsche fans who like to keep it classic and drive a stick have reasons to be happy as well, because although only 15 percent of 911s are currently ordered with manual gearboxes, the carmaker’s engineering boss has assured that Porsche will keep offering the option of one for as long as there is demand.

It’s a USP for Porsche to have a manual in the 911 range. I think we will fight for it for as long as possible,” Mossle concluded.

 
 
 
 
 

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