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A 1970 Plymouth Superbird Is Yet Another Four-Wheeled Victim of Hurricane Ian

As I'm sure that you’re up to date by now with everything concerning Hurricane Ian, there’s no need for any more formalities. However, you might not have seen the 1970 Plymouth Superbird yet that was carried away by the rushing water from the top of a car platform, from inside a garage into the street, only to be turned on its head, so to speak.
1970 Plymouth Superbird 13 photos
Hurricane Ian damagesGarage1970 Plymouth Road Runner HEMI Superbird1970 Plymouth Road Runner HEMI Superbird1970 Plymouth Road Runner HEMI Superbird1970 Plymouth Road Runner HEMI Superbird1970 Plymouth Road Runner HEMI Superbird1970 Plymouth Road Runner HEMI Superbird1970 Plymouth Road Runner HEMI Superbird1970 Plymouth Road Runner HEMI Superbird1970 Plymouth Road Runner HEMI Superbird1970 Plymouth Road Runner HEMI Superbird
In total, there were four cars in that garage, with two getting rescued before the disaster hit. Out of the remaining two, one seems to have landed on its "feet," while sadly enough, the other was not so fortunate, landing belly up.

Just to clarify. My uncle got the two out, the other 2 were fully raised on the hoists, and the water got high enough to wash them off, and blow them through the doors,” the garage owner’s nephew supposedly said in a social media post.

A category-four storm like Ian has winds traveling at speeds of 130-156 mph (209-251 kph), according to the National Hurricane Center. However, as far as damages go, the tipped-over Plymouth Superbird doesn’t seem to have sustained irreparable ones.

On the original Reddit post, people seem to have actual heartache over the incident, with the majority of comments expressing support and empathy instead of irony or apathy.

The reason for this positivity could be that the people responding to the post have a genuine passion for the 1970 Plymouth Superbird. And rightfully so, because it is indeed a very special breed of car.

It was born in response to the ‘69 Dodge Charger Daytona. The Superbird was Plymouth’s take on the “winged warrior.”

There were only 503 Charger Daytonas out in the wild, whereas the Superbird model has a bit of a mystery around its actual production figures. Most experts tend to agree on roughly 1,900 units. As for the present, there are believed to be only 1,000 of the legendary bird that can still flap their V8 wings.

Speaking about their V8, in total, there were three engine trims. Two came with a 440 CI (7.2-liter) V8 engine and one with a 426 CI (7.0-liter) Hemi V8. The 440 had either a four-barrel carburetor or a six-barrel one. The first one outputted 375 hp (380 ps) with 480 lb-ft (651 Nm) of torque, while the six-barrel produced 390 hp (395 ps) with 490 lb-ft (664 Nm) of torque.

The Hemi was something else because there were only 135 of them ever made. The 426 CI (7.0-liter) aluminum engine produced no less than 425 hp (431 ps) with 490 lb-ft (664 Nm) of torque. Safe to say that it’s a pretty rare bird. One was even sold for a whopping $1.6 million.

Regarding our flipped-over Plymouth, let’s hope it will soon spread its wings again.

Editor's note: After the third image from the gallery, the 1970 Plymouth Superbird shown is part of an auction, unrelated to the Florida incident.

 
 
 
 
 

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