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9K-Mile 1980 Honda CBX Wants to Show You the Ways of Collectible Six-Cylinder Goodness

Over the years, Honda made a fair number of cool bikes that would never taste commercial success, and the CBX is probably the most iconic.
1980 Honda CBX 25 photos
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Displaying approximately 8,800 miles (14,000 km) on the clock, this 1980 Honda CBX looks exceedingly pristine for a motorcycle that’s been around for more than four decades. Right before it was acquired by the present-day owner, the classic icon received a youthful set of Shinko Tour Master tires, new fork seals, and a modern rectifier.

In addition, the motor oil was flushed and the valve clearances have been optimized for good measure. A fresh battery was brought into the picture under current ownership, along with a replacement gas tank that can store up to 5.3 gallons (20 liters) of fossil syrup. Now, let’s proceed with a closer look at the technical specs characterizing the almighty CBX, shall we?

Its power source is an air- and oil-cooled 1,047cc inline-six with 9.3:1 compression, 28 mm (1.1-inch) Keihin carbs, and 24 valves motioned via twin cams. The four-stroke colossus has the ability to spawn as much as 105 hp and 52 pound-feet (71 Nm) of torque at the crankshaft. A five-speed gearbox is tasked with feeding the engine’s grunt to the rear wheel by means of a chain final drive.

When taking off from a standstill, Honda’s gladiator will require just 4.6 seconds to hit 60 mph (96 kph) and a further 6.8 to run the quarter-mile. Eventually, the CBX is going to plateau at a very respectable top speed of 135 mph (217 kph), while stopping power comes from dual 276 mm (10.9-inch) rotors up north and a single 296 mm (11.7-inch) module down south.

The bike’s suspension arrangement comprises air-assisted 35 mm (1.4-inch) forks and twin preload-adjustable shocks. You may find this 1980 MY gemstone listed on Bring a Trailer, where it’ll be welcoming your bids at no reserve until Tuesday, November 29. Venturing to top the highest bid would set one back more than $15k, though, so don’t get too excited unless you’ve got deep pockets.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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