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7K-Mile 1975 Yamaha DT250 Lets You View Off-Roading Through a Classic Two-Stroke Lens

When the concept of mass-produced dirt bikes was still in its infancy, this bad boy already called trails and unpaved roads its home.
1975 Yamaha DT250 27 photos
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When Yamaha decided to tap into the off-road segment with the DT-1 back in 1968, they’ve really struck gold. At that point, purpose-built dirt bikes from OEMs were rather obscure, and the rise of dual-sports initiated by BMW’s legendary R 80 G/S was still over a decade away. Thus, it should go without saying that Yamaha’s DT-1s sold like hot cakes, with a total of 12,000 units leaving the factory.

Many reiterations have followed in the DT series over the coming years, one of which can be seen right above these paragraphs. It is a 1975 MY DT250 with approximately 7,400 miles (12,000 km) on the clock, sporting an RK Takasago drive chain, fresh sprockets and knobby, yet road-friendly Kenda tires.

Additionally, the specimen’s flasher relay, battery and rectifier have all been replaced with modern components by the previous owner. As for its fundamentals, Yamaha’s rugged predator obtains its power from an air-cooled two-stroke thumper with 6.8:1 compression and a displacement of 246cc. The single-cylinder engine is linked to a five-speed gearbox, and it can summon up to 20 ponies at 6,500 rpm.

Modest though these digits may seem, one has to keep in mind that the DT250B weighs just 304 pounds (138 kg) with fluids, so it can certainly deliver a healthy ratio of giggles per horsepower! This two-stroke beauty is dragged to a stop by traditional drum brakes, while its suspension arrangement comprises telescopic forks at the front and piggyback shocks at the rear.

The pristine ‘75 MY exemplar displayed in this article’s photo gallery is currently searching for a new home at no reserve, and you may place your bids on Bring a Trailer until tomorrow (June 24). Those who are interested will need about four grand to top the highest bid, which is registered at $3,750 for the time being.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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