autoevolution

756-Mile 2005 Triumph Daytona 650 Looks Eager to Turn Heads and Carve Twisties

The Daytona nameplate is loved by many sport bike aficionados, and it shouldn’t be too hard to see why that’s so.
2005 Triumph Daytona 650 31 photos
2005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 6502005 Triumph Daytona 650
As it had only stayed in production for about a year, the 2005 Triumph Daytona 650 is rare and quite desirable among collectors, albeit not as popular as the three-cylinder Daytona 675 released later on. In any case, you’ll be enjoying a healthy ratio of smiles per gallon regardless of which model you get to throw a leg over!

The startling Daytona 650 displayed in these photos is entirely unblemished and just about as good as new, showing 756 miles (1,217 km) on its six-digit odometer. Under current ownership, this sporty predator was fitted with modern fork seals and boots, as well as a replacement battery, a new fuel pump, and fresh fluids all-round.

Within the confines of its stunning bodywork, Triumph’s titan houses a liquid-cooled 646cc inline-four engine that’s linked to a six-speed transmission. The fuel-injected powerplant boasts dual overhead camshafts, four valves per cylinder, and a sizeable compression ratio of 12.85:1.

By producing up to 114 hp at 12,500 rpm and 50 pound-feet (68 Nm) of torque at 11,500 whirls, this bad boy can push the 650 to a top speed of 156 mph (251 kph). There’s an aluminum twin-spar frame holding everything in place, while front-end suspension duties are handled by 43 mm (1.7-inch) forks with preload, rebound, and compression settings.

A single shock absorber can be found at the opposite pole, and it, too, is fully adjustable for maximized efficiency. Braking duties are the responsibility of dual 308 mm (12.1-inch) floating discs and four-piston calipers up north, along with a 220 mm (8.7-inch) rotor and a single-piston caliper down south.

You may bid for a chance to snatch this mint-condition Daytona on Iconic Motorbike Auctions, where it will remain listed until the afternoon of November 18! A mere four grand would be enough to put you in the lead, but the chances of meeting the reserve with that amount are practically non-existent. If you’re feeling more generous, be sure to act sooner rather than later.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories