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5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million

I often hear people say that money doesn't bring happiness. And for the most part, I agree. You can still be unhappy even if you have millions of dollars in your account. But then again, you have many more options to forget about your day-to-day problems.
5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million 25 photos
Photo: Mechatronik/Cartique
5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million5 Porsche Reasons to Spend $7 Million
For some people, collecting supercars is as easy as buying Hot Wheels for others. Like with diecast vehicles, you can profit by playing your cards right. I can barely keep up with a garage of three cars. But I sometimes indulge in window shopping. Over the years, I've found several exclusive online markets that only deal with the most iconic cars ever built by man.

And this one company is currently advertising a mini-collection of amazing Porsches, with a total value of about $7.5 million, give or take. There were nine cars, but two have already found new homes. I've selected the five best ones here, and there's no surprise that they're also the most expensive.

I left out the 911 Turbo (996) WLS and the 356 1500 Super A Cabriolet, as they're almost cheap enough to come as a bonus if you buy the whole package below. I'm no financial expert, but I'm willing to bet that spending $7.5 million on these will probably be worth at least $10 million in 5 years. As the joke goes, follow me for more financial advice!

Porsche 911 (997) GT2 RS

5 Porsche Reasons to Spend \$7 Million
Photo: Mechatronik/Cartique
You'll notice that I've listed these cars from most affordable to most expensive. So you can imagine what's coming if the Porsche 911 (997) GT2 RS is the cheapest car here. Still, you'll have to wire about $640,000 to this company's account if you'd like the keys to this beast. The first-gen GT2 RS might not be as impressive or as ludicrous fast as the 991, but you shouldn't underestimate it either.

While the 911 Turbo S of the time was good enough for 523 hp, the GT2 RS was one step ahead at 612 hp. The latter lapped the Nurburgring Nordschleife in seven minutes and 18 seconds, something the Turbo S would achieve almost a decade later. But there are many more differences to discuss, and one is the limited availability of this car.

Driving this thing to a car meet, the chance of seeing another one there is slim to none. That's because Porsche only built 500 units! But it keeps improving: the car you see here only has 408 miles (657 km) on its odometer, so it's pristine. I've only seen one with fewer miles; it sold for $777,000 last year. So, who wants to go for a 200 mph (321 kph) run on the Autobahn?

Porsche 911 Carrera 4 RUF BTR

5 Porsche Reasons to Spend \$7 Million
Photo: Mechatronik/Cartique
To the untrained eye, the RUF BTR might seem like an ordinary Porsche 911 Carrera 4. And you have to love the sleeper element here. Even by today's standards, you'd certainly be impressed if someone would pass you doing 190 mph. However, RUF achieved this with the BTR back in 1984. I imagine this car would have raised hell on the Japanese Wangan in the good old days.

It's no wonder the creators of that famous anime made the Porsche "Blackbird" one of the show's stars. This car left the factory in 1989 as a simple Carrera 4, but the owner immediately wanted an upgrade. If you're willing to pay $646,000, you'll get access to the 414 hp icon if you don't mind the mileage. It is the most used car on the list, as the odometer shows about 1,800 miles (2,900 km).

Suppose you do the math; that adds up to 52 miles (85 km) yearly. It must have been tough to refrain from driving it, but I'm sure the owner had other vehicles to play around with when needed. Either way, the RUF BTR will impress any high-end Porsche collector if you buy it for the bragging rights.

Porsche 962 C

5 Porsche Reasons to Spend \$7 Million
Photo: Mechatronik/Cartique
While you can drive either of the first two cars on public roads, things are entirely different this time. Some people could get away with flying down the Autobahn in a race car, but is anyone bonkers enough to try? I am a massive fan of the 962 C and would be happy if I could drive one. Porsche completed chassis 165 in 1991 as a reserve vehicle for its racing program.

It would have been a shame if it had never stretched its legs at the racetrack. But the opportunity arose that same year when it competed in the FIA Sports Car World Championship. It ran 267 miles (430 km) at the Nurburgring with Obermaier Racing, completed in P4. For 23 years, this 962 C has sat inside a museum, all 680 hp tucked away for the long hibernation.

The most brilliant move would be to continue to do the same. But if you're going to pay $1.5 million for a car, shouldn't you enjoy it? There are plenty of historic events where you can go and have a blast if you have the skills and courage to get behind the wheel.

Porsche 911 Carrera 2.8 RSR

5 Porsche Reasons to Spend \$7 Million
Photo: Mechatronik/Cartique
Any car will seem tame compared to a 962 C. But that doesn't mean you should treat this 911 lightly. See what I did there? Just think of all the numbers revolving around this vehicle. You're looking at a sub-2000 lbs (907 kg) package with almost 300 hp. I'm sure driving one today would feel as phenomenal as it did in the '70s. The 2.8 RSR is so rare that it almost makes the Carrera RS 2.7 look like an ordinary vehicle.

Porsche only built about 50 of these cars; who knows how many are still in one piece? You're looking at chassis number 19, which has an extensive racing record behind it, including participation at Le Mans. With several victories under its belt, you're not just buying a car; you're buying a piece of history. Since its restoration, it has only added about 621 miles (1,000 km) to its odometer.

Yes, this was a race car, but it's road-legal, and you can still compete in it if you'd like that. Reportedly, you'd be the only owner of a Seablue Carrera 2.8 RSR on the planet, but you need to pay a hefty price to get to that point. You could buy many things for $2.1 million, but will either be as unique as this car?

Porsche 911 (993) GT2 EVO "Harlekin"

5 Porsche Reasons to Spend \$7 Million
Photo: Mechatronik/Cartique
The same man who owned the 962 C discussed earlier also had the unique 911 GT2 EVO Harlekin in his collection. It's challenging to cope with how insane this car truly is. The 993 GT2 was a formidable machine, with as much as 444 hp on tap in the late '90s. It was already relatively light at under 2,900 lbs, but Porsche needed something more to take on the GT1 class.

So they made the GT2 Evo lighter and more powerful: 600 hp and 2,425 lbs (1,110 kg), to be more precise. While just under 60 993 GT2 left the factory, fewer Evos exist. At best, there are ten other GT2 Evo owners on Planet Earth (if someone doesn't own more than one). But the Harlekin is unique. I've yet to discover who the owner of this car used to be. Still, he was undoubtedly highly influential in persuading Porsche to sell him their one-off celebration model.

I could stare at photos of this car for hours in a row, and I can only think of how even Hot Wheels replicas of the 933 GT2 are so popular and expensive. If there's a list of ten most coveted Porsches ever, I'm sure the Harlekin would be on it. But if you want to see it in your garage, you must pay about $2.7 million. Now, I'm off to try to find a replica of this car for Assetto Corsa so I can at least imagine how it must feel to reach that level.
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About the author: Dragos Chitulescu
Dragos Chitulescu profile photo

The things Dragos enjoys the most in life are, in no particular order: cars, motorcycles, diecast cars, and drifting. He's seen (and driven) many vehicles since he started his writing career back in 2009, but his garage currently houses a 1991 Mazda RX-7 FC3S Turbo II and a 1999 Suzuki SV650-S.
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