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49-Mile 1981 Honda CBX Spent Decades on Display, Shows Less Rust Than Many Newer Bikes

Few things in the world can soothe our eardrums like the sound of six wailing cylinders at peak rpm.
1981 Honda CBX 40 photos
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Up until 2004, this museum-grade Honda CBX was kept on display at a dealership, and here are only 49 miles (79 km) separating it from its factory crate. The '81 MY sport-tourer is completely stock from head to toe, so you can be absolutely certain that it’ll end up fetching a pretty penny at auction!

With this being said, we’ll have you know Honda’s six-cylinder legend is being auctioned off on Bring a Trailer, where it shall remain listed until Sunday, June 19. As of now, one would need around fifteen grand to top the highest bid, which is currently registered at a very generous $13,000.

The Japanese beast is moved forward through the use of a fierce 1,047cc inline-six powerplant, featuring 28 mm (1.1 inches) Keihin carburetors, dual overhead camshafts and as many as 24 valves. Accompanied by a five-speed gearbox and a wet multi-plate clutch, the air-cooled mill can supply 98 ponies when its crank whirls at 9,000 rpm.

As you descend on the rev range, what you’ll be encountering is a maximum torque output of 63 pound-feet (85 Nm). This force gets fed to the rear Comstar wheel by means of a chain final drive, and it can eventually result in a top speed of 135 mph (217 kph).

To accelerate from zero to 60 mph (96 kph), the 1981 Honda CBX will only require 4.6 blistering ticks. Its dry weight is measured at a steep 545 pounds (247 kg), and front-end suspension duties are managed by air-adjustable telescopic forks.

At the opposite pole, the classic touring icon stands on a Pro-Link arrangement that comprises a single shock absorber and an aluminum swingarm. When stopping power needs to be called into action, Honda’s titan relies on dual 276 mm (10.9 inches) ventilated discs at the front and a solo 296 mm (11.7 inches) rotor at six o’clock.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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