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$42K “Gooseneck” Motorcycle Really Wants To Be a Custom Harley-Davidson

Officially, bobbers are motorcycles styled so that they lose all the excess weight and parts, and go for a rather minimalistic approach to things in a bid to make themselves faster. In doing so, some of them end up becoming real visual jewels, vistas that stick with the onlooker long after they’ve passed by.
Gooseneck bobber 13 photos
Harley-Davidson TGS Nr. 58 Bobber Old School SoftailHarley-Davidson TGS Nr. 58 Bobber Old School SoftailHarley-Davidson TGS Nr. 58 Bobber Old School SoftailHarley-Davidson TGS Nr. 58 Bobber Old School SoftailHarley-Davidson TGS Nr. 58 Bobber Old School SoftailHarley-Davidson TGS Nr. 58 Bobber Old School SoftailHarley-Davidson TGS Nr. 58 Bobber Old School SoftailHarley-Davidson TGS Nr. 58 Bobber Old School SoftailHarley-Davidson TGS Nr. 58 Bobber Old School SoftailHarley-Davidson TGS Nr. 58 Bobber Old School SoftailHarley-Davidson TGS Nr. 58 Bobber Old School SoftailHarley-Davidson TGS Nr. 58 Bobber Old School Softail
The one we have here is part of that group, as is sure to stay with you for at least a while after you’ve moved on to other online readings. It’s a chopper/cruiser/bobber kind of machine, assembled in a series of German shops and now selling over in Europe at the hands of Cult-Werk for 39,950 euros or the equivalent of $42,000.

The bike is listed on Mobile as the Harley-Davidson TGS Nr. 58 Bobber Old School Softail, making no secret of what it wants to be. For all intents and purposes, though, names other than Harley's contributed to making it what it is.

The bike’s frame is something called a Santee Gooseneck and it’s assembled, like a wide range of others like it, in the facilities of another German shop, Thunderbike. As per the listing, it holds in its embrace a RevTech 88ci engine working a primary belt drive, breathing through a BSL exhaust system, and developing just 49 hp.

You might notice that on the engine it says TGS. That’s yet another German garage, which for this build was responsible for various covers, but also the fuel and oil tanks, the front and rear fenders, lights, and side license plate holder.

The bike is not new, as it has already spun its equally-sized 18-inch wheels (with the rear one just 200 mm wide, the smallest we’ve seen in a while) for 3,700 km (2,300 miles). Even so, we’re told the “TGS is in almost perfect condition.” 

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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