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$260K for a One-in-One Original Four-Speed Hemi Charger R/T From '71 With 15K Miles
Ten grand over a quarter of a million of George Washingtons, that's how much this Gold Metallic Dodge Charger from 1971. Of course, there's got to be a good story for that much money. Make that a great story. Sit back and read on. This Mopar is the last of its kind, but it honors his name with stellar grandeur.

$260K for a One-in-One Original Four-Speed Hemi Charger R/T From '71 With 15K Miles

Original 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-SpeedOriginal 1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi Four-Speed
In September of 1970, on the 22nd day, a non-so-regular Dodge came out the factory's gates on Lynch Road, Detroit, Michigan. The car was quite a loner, as no other Dodge was like it. First, it was a Charger badged R/T (Road/Track). Secondly, it had a three-figure under-the-hood particularity, sitting directly below the hood labeled "R/T" (if anyone dares to ask, that number is 426).

Because numbers aren't the best way of getting the word out about almost anything, Mother Mopar christened the 426 offspring "Hemi." Let's recap: we have a 1971 Dodge Charger R/T with a 426 Hemi V8. Good – that's a 63-member club. It also had the four-speed manual transmission – and only 29 other R/Ts had that privilege. However, only one came with both and is still around today – you're looking at it.

The car wasn't meant to be driven regularly or randomly, which explains why the odometer recorded just under 15,000 miles (24,000 km). This unequaled Hemi Charger was kept in the garage. But here's where things get attractive: the owner bought the car new and held on to it for four decades. Not only did he not drive it much, but he did not drive it at all in adverse weather. To be clear: he kept his worshiped R/T out of any meteorological harm's way with fierce protective care.

Many people go to extreme lengths to maintain their cars in collector condition. Still, occasionally, those cars get a well-deserved wash, correct? Wrong! This Charger never got a wash in his first 40 years of life. Meticulous cleaning, yeas, with a damp cloth, but no pressure – or simpleton hose – wash. Not even a brush and bucket.

Of course, the numbers match bumper-to-bumper and road-to-roof; you didn't even need to ask that. The car changed hands in 2011 and received a restoration (but only because the original buyer repainted the Charger – occasion with which he also put an undercoating to protect it.)

The cosmetic restoration turned into a complete rotisserie project, with every single vehicle element being taken apart, inspected, cleaned – if needed – and then carefully assembled back. No repair work was involved for the body, and only strictly necessary replacements were made for the drive train and chassis. This car is as close to the original as mechanically possible for a driving-condition, mint-appearance vehicle of 51 years ago.

The rubber bushing and one lower ball joint are not original, but that's it. Original torsion bars and leaf springs – check. Original Hemi K frame – check. Original 3.54-ratio Dana 60 - check. I told you everything was thoroughly checked.

New calipers and brake pads equip the rotors, and new metal brake lines keep the car in road-going condition. For this reason, the fuel tank, along with its lines, was replaced (with date-correct ones, obviously).

If anyone reading this is a die-hard Mopar fan and asks about the 1970 Go Wing on the trunk, please know that it is carried over from the previous model year. The car was built as a very early production order, a few days after the model became available on the U.S. market. It is the original piece that came with this R/T. Just as are the tires and their wheels. (Not only this rare Camaro gets the spoils)

The Dodge has a long list of build sheet options (see it in the photo gallery) that amounted to a grand total of $4,965 (1971, remember? The base price for an R/T was $3,775). But this Hemi-powered Mopar does not look a second older than it did 51 years and two months ago. The interior is a time-traveling experience: everything but the headliner is from the factory.

The engine got fresh rods and main bearings – as a precaution, more than necessity – as well as belts, hoses, and wiring harnesses. Once again, this car did not see any racing action or any other means of Hemi overwork. Most vehicles with these specs blasted the dragstrip like there was no tomorrow (for many of them, there wasn't). Some of them survived to this day – like this 1969 Hemi Charger R/T.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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