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26-Years-Owned 1969 Honda CB450 K1 Regains Its Youth After a Fastidious Restoration

Thanks to a caring owner who really knows how to take care of his machines, this CB450 is almost as good as new.
1969 Honda CB450 K1 20 photos
1969 Honda CB450 K11969 Honda CB450 K11969 Honda CB450 K11969 Honda CB450 K11969 Honda CB450 K11969 Honda CB450 K11969 Honda CB450 K11969 Honda CB450 K11969 Honda CB450 K11969 Honda CB450 K11969 Honda CB450 K11969 Honda CB450 K11969 Honda CB450 K11969 Honda CB450 K11969 Honda CB450 K11969 Honda CB450 K11969 Honda CB450 K11969 Honda CB450 K11969 Honda CB450 K1
The 1969 Honda CB450 K1 is brought to life by an air-cooled 444cc parallel-twin engine, which is placed inside a semi-duplex cradle frame. Featuring dual overhead camshafts and a total of four valves, this bad boy is capable of generating up to 45 hp at about 9,000 revs per minute.

When the four-stroke powerplant purrs at 7,000 rpm, a peak torque output of 28 pound-feet (37 Nm) will be sent to a chain final drive via a five-speed gearbox. The CB450 weighs in at 412 pounds (187 kg) dry, and it can hit a respectable top speed of 110 mph (177 kph).

Moving on to the chassis, the bike’s suspension consists of telescopic forks and dual preload-adjustable shock absorbers. Braking duties are managed by a twin-leading-shoe drum up north and a single-leading-shoe unit down south. The mechanical treasure houses a fuel capacity of 3.7 gallons (14 liters), while its wheelbase measures 53 inches (1,300 mm).

The creature shown above has spent the last 26 years with its current owner, who installed an assortment of high-end aftermarket goodies. In the cockpit, you will find a clubman-style handlebar that wears rubber grips and a single bar-end mirror on the left-hand side.

As of 2018, the CB450’s two-up saddle was reupholstered, and its bodywork received a fresh coat of metallic-blue paint. Moreover, you will find a set of repurposed carbs that hail from a CB500T, as well as modern spark plugs and a dry cell battery developed by Shorai. The twin-cylinder mill underwent another makeover back in 1995, when its pistons and rings were replaced with youthful substitutes.

This shiny piece of Japanese machinery is going under the hammer as we speak, and you may bid for it at no reserve on Bring A Trailer. With two days to go until the auctioning deadline, the top bidder is offering a modest 2,200 bones to get their hands on Honda’s antique head-turner.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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