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2023 Toyota Tundra V8 Engine Option Listed on the Configurator, Wishful Thinking Much?

Twinned with the Land Cruiser and LX, the half-ton pickup truck produced by Toyota in Texas isn’t available with a V8. The 5.7L i-Force V8 was discontinued in favor of the i-Force V6 that’s referred to as the V35A-FTS, which is strange because it flaunts… wait for it… 3,444 cubic centimeters.
2023 Toyota Tundra V8 Engine Option Listed on the Configurator 12 photos
2023 Toyota Tundra V8 Engine Option Listed on the Configurator2023 Toyota Tundra V8 Engine Option Listed on the Configurator2023 Toyota Tundra configurator after correction2023 Toyota Tundra SR5 SX Package2023 Toyota Tundra SR5 SX Package2023 Toyota Tundra SR5 SX Package2023 Toyota Tundra SR5 SX Package2023 Toyota Tundra SR5 SX Package2023 Toyota Tundra SR5 SX Package2023 Toyota Tundra SR5 SX Package2023 Toyota Tundra SR5 SX Package
The switch to a six-cylinder lump also paved the way for a new transmission, which features ten rather than six forward ratios. Fuel economy and emission regulations certainly had a part in this change. If driven like the EPA expects you to drive it, there’s no denying the all-new Tundra drinks marginally less gasoline than the V8-engined Tundra from the prior gen.

Many customers have taken to 2022-and-beyond Tundra forums to complain about woeful gas mileage, but more importantly, some of them have complained about extremely varied issues. In terms of mechanical gremlins, the wastegate actuator issue takes the cake. Incorrect engine control module programming also needs to be mentioned, along with rear axle shafts that may separate while driving. It’s not a pretty picture, innit?

In light of these particularities, some peeps are decrying the death of the V8-engined Tundra. It had a few problems of its own, the gas mileage was terrible, but on the other hand, it proved to be a dependable workhorse. By sheer coincidence, Toyota seems to agree with these nostalgic customers.

The build and price tool momentarily listed the 2023 model with the i-Force V8 and six-speed automatic of the previous generation, and two members of a Facebook group have kindly posted screenshots of this mistake. One of them notes that “maybe old is gold,” which is hard to deny because a naturally-aspirated V8 will always be more interesting than a twin-turbo V6 despite not having as much power and torque as the more efficient engine.

Regardless of which V-type configuration one may prefer, the hard truth is that the Japanese brand won’t turn back to eight cylinders for the Tundra.

 
 
 
 
 

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