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2022 Toyota Tundra 6x6 Looks Menacing, Six-Wheel Build Still Underway

The Tundra recently made headlines for one too many issues, but on this occasion, we’re covering the first six-wheeled conversion. Built by a Florida-based company by the name of Force Motorsport, this fellow is rocking Weld Racing Ledge Beadlock W901 wheels finished in bronze.
2022 Toyota Tundra 6x6 build by Force Motorsport 19 photos
2022 Toyota Tundra 6x6 build by Force Motorsport2022 Toyota Tundra 6x6 build by Force Motorsport2022 Toyota Tundra 6x6 build by Force Motorsport2022 Toyota Tundra production at San Antonio, Texas plant2022 Toyota Tundra production at San Antonio, Texas plant2022 Toyota Tundra production at San Antonio, Texas plant2022 Toyota Tundra production at San Antonio, Texas plant2022 Toyota Tundra production at San Antonio, Texas plant2022 Toyota Tundra production at San Antonio, Texas plant2022 Toyota Tundra production at San Antonio, Texas plant2022 Toyota Tundra production at San Antonio, Texas plant2022 Toyota Tundra production at San Antonio, Texas plant2022 Toyota Tundra production at San Antonio, Texas plant2022 Toyota Tundra production at San Antonio, Texas plant2022 Toyota Tundra production at San Antonio, Texas plant2022 Toyota Tundra production at San Antonio, Texas plant2022 Toyota Tundra production at San Antonio, Texas plant2022 Toyota Tundra production at San Antonio, Texas plant
We can also notice Cooper Discoverer mud-terrain rubber boots, along with no bed. A recent Instagram story reveals that Force Motorsport has fitted an incomplete cargo box, which makes this build a work in progress at the moment of writing. Tube steps also need to be mentioned, along with black Tundra badges on the front doors, black mirrors, and black door handles.

Priced from $35,950 excluding destination charge for the SR trim level with the double cab and 6.5-foot bed, the Tundra is better suited as a CrewMax.

Based on a few visual giveaways, this particular example appears to be an SR5 with the largest cab available. Tinted for good measure, the six-wheeled truck also features Force Motorsport decals on the windshield.

In related news, Toyota moved 22,643 units of the Tundra in the first quarter of 2022. That’s better than the same period last year, but on the other hand, the Tundra still doesn’t challenge the half-ton pickups of the Big Three in Detroit. There are a few reasons for that, starting with the high price tag.

We also have to remember that Toyota promises a maximum payload capacity of 1,940 pounds (880 kilograms) and a maximum towing capacity of 12,000 pounds (5,443 kilograms), figures that don’t cut the mustard.

One of the biggest issues prospective customers have with the redesigned Tundra concerns the powertrain. Rather than the wastegate issue that affects certain trucks, the idea of a twin-turbo V6 instead of a V8 is unsettling for some people. And finally, opting for the hybrid powertrain gives you more power than Ford’s PowerBoost yet worse fuel economy than the F-150.

The Environmental Protection Agency estimates the i-Force Max at 22 miles per gallon (10.7 liters per 100 kilometers) for rear-wheel drive or 21 miles per gallon (11.2 l/100 km) for four-wheel drive, combined. The PowerBoost averages 25 and 23 miles per gallon (9.4 and 10.2 l/100 km).



Editor's note: Pictures of Tundra production also featured in the gallery.
This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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