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2022 Mazda MX-30 Aces Government Crash Tests

Revealed at the 2019 Tokyo Motor Show, the MX-30 is a tough sell because it fails to perform as you’d expect from an electric vehicle. The biggest disappointment concerns driving range, which is woeful at best.
2022 Mazda MX-30 28 photos
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Only available in California, the MX-30 is EPA-rated 100 miles or 161 kilometers if you prefer the metric system. More than a decade ago, the Environmental Protection Agency rated the Nissan Leaf at 73 miles or 117 kilometers. This begs a question: why did Mazda compromise so much?

The Japanese automaker is much obliged to answer with three letters: LCA. The Life-Cycle Assessment is a technique designed to measure the total environmental impact of a product over its entire life, from the extraction of the raw materials necessary for production to end-of-life disposal.

In other words, Mazda wants to be greener than a vegetarian’s cucumber smoothie. Most consumers, however, don’t buy this hogwash because most of them put driving range high on their priorities list. Another problem of the MX-30 concerns the pillar-less rear doors that getting in and out a big hassle.

On the upside, it looks interesting. The National Highway Traffic Administration has also gifted the MX-30 with top ratings in government crash test. The Euro NCAP also lists this crossover with maximum points for crashworthiness, but on the other hand, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety has yet to test the MX-30. The IIHS is known for its draconic tests, which provide a more accurate picture of the car’s safety.

“We aim to offer a confident and joyful driving experience with industry-leading safety features that support and protect our drivers and passengers,” declared Mazda North American Operations president and chief executive officer Jeff Guyton. Considering that we’re dealing with a $33,470 starting price sans taxes compared to $34,000 for the 258-mile (415-kilometer) Hyundai Kona Electric, everyone was expecting the MX-30 to be safe.



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