autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 

2021 Vauxhall Insignia Drops Wagon Body Style, Sedan Gets More Expensive

In its second generation since 2017, the Insignia couldn’t have arrived at a worse time for the Opel and Vauxhall brands. General Motors sold both European brands to Groupe PSA in 2017 as well, and the French overlord appears to be doing everything it can to turn the Insignia into a bigger flop than it is, eventually discontinuing the GM design to leave the Peugeot 508 with fewer rivals in this segment.
2021 Vauxhall Insignia 20 photos
2021 Opel Insignia2021 Opel Insignia2021 Opel Insignia2021 Opel Insignia2021 Opel Insignia2021 Opel Insignia2021 Opel Insignia2021 Opel Insignia2021 Opel Insignia2021 Opel Insignia2021 Opel Insignia2021 Opel Insignia2021 Opel Insignia2021 Opel Insignia2021 Opel Insignia2021 Opel Insignia2021 Opel Insignia2021 Opel Insignia2021 Opel Insignia
The Vauxhall Insignia for the 2021 model year has dropped the station wagon option from the options list, and because of the mid-cycle refresh, the sedan is almost three grand more expensive than the 2020 pre-facelift. “Wait, that’s three thousand pounds sterling?”

Indeed, ladies and gents! At £23,120 for a 120-horsepower turbo diesel with 1.5 liters of displacement and front-wheel-drive, the Insignia is cheap but way too overpriced compared to the outgoing model's £20,045. The reason for this increase can be boiled down to a different list of trim levels, now kicking off with the SE Nav.

The question is, what do you get in the Insignia SE Nav? As the name implies, the Multimedia Navi infotainment system with a 7.0-inch touchscreen display opens the list. It is joined by digital radio, media streaming, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, two USB ports and AUX IN, comfort front seats, LED headlights and taillights, 17-inch alloy wheels, rain-sensing wipers, high-beam assist, and traffic sign recognition.

The SRi NAV, SRi VX-Line Nav, and Ultimate Nav are next, and at the very top of the range, the GSi features the most potent engine, all-wheel-drive, and a nine-speed automatic transmission for the princely price of 38,850 pounds sterling. Even more confusingly, Vauxhall offers no fewer than four transmissions options. The entry-level choice is a six-speed manual, followed by a CVT, an eight-speeder, and the nine-speed automatic transmission that’s exclusive to the 2.0-liter turbo gasoline mill.

At the beginning of the year, the automotive industry in the United Kingdom reported the biggest sales slip in seven years. New car sales fell by 2.3 percent to 2.3 million, and Vauxhall fell 9.9 percent from 177,298 units in 2018 to 159,830 in 2019.

 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories