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2020 Aston Martin Rapide E Test Mule Reveals Digital Instrument Cluster

It’s been a heck of a long time since Aston Martin revealed a Rapide-based concept with an all-electric powertrain. But after the Gaydon-based automaker signed an agreement with Williams Advanced Engineering, Aston Martin decided to put the Rapide E into production.
2020 Aston Martin Rapide E validation prototype 18 photos
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The announcement was made in June 2017, and guess what? The first validation prototype moves under its own power! The clip at the end of the story was published on Twitter by none other than Andy Palmer, the head honcho of Aston Martin Lagonda.

Featuring a “breakthrough 800-volt battery,” the Rapide E features similar styling to the internal combustion-engined luxury sedan. We wouldn’t be surprised if the platform is a modified VH Generation III, which dates back to 2010. The VH in the Vanquish predates the Generation I in the DB9.

The old underpinnings might be the Achilles heel for the Rapide E, more so if you remember that the rest of the lineup transitioned to the Second Century vehicle architecture starting with the DB11. The Valkyrie, on the other hand, is a different story because of the input from Red Bull Racing.

Because the validation prototype is nothing more than a work-in-progress test mule, the clip doesn’t showcase full-on acceleration. The sound of two electric motors driving the rear wheels is noticeable. A digital instrument cluster is also featured, right behind the leather-wrapped steering wheel.

The 610 PS and 950 Nm shadow the Rapide AMR, which comes with a 5.9-liter V12 that relies on natural aspiration. As for the 65-kWh battery, Aston Martin expects a driving range in the ballpark of 200 miles (320 kilometers) under the Worldwide Harmonised Light Vehicle Test Procedure.

Acceleration takes just under four seconds despite the sticky Pirelli tires, and top speed is limited to 155 mph (250 km/h) because of the single-speed reduction gear. The Tesla Model S P100D can also manage 155 mph, but the all-wheel-drive configuration translates to quicker acceleration regardless of driving scenario.

Only 155 examples of the Rapide E will ever be made at the St Athan plant where the DBX will be manufactured. Pricing? Aston Martin didn’t say a word about this matter, but estimates put the Rapide E at £250,000 before options. The Rapide AMR, by comparison, starts at £194,950 in the United Kingdom.



 
 
 
 
 

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