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2017 Volkswagen Polo Photographed Without Any Camo in South Africa

The all-new Volkswagen Polo is set to enter production three months from now. However, it's been photographed completely undisguised in South Africa earlier today.
2017 Volkswagen Polo Photographed Without Any Camo in South Africa 3 photos
2017 Volkswagen Polo Photographed Without Any Camo in South Africa2017 Volkswagen Polo Photographed Without Any Camo in South Africa
These photos were received by local magazine Cars from a reader and show the hatchback in both the front and rear three-quarter view.

Every part of the design is exactly what people expected, a smaller Golf from the front with a few hints of the old Polo at the back. And like the SEAT Ibiza, it features sharp taillights that cut into the trunk opening.

But as the eye can plainly see, there are plenty of things wrong with this particular prototype. The headlights have a big chunk of black plastic that just sits there and does nothing, while the taillights have this silver frame that looks horrible. It also seems like there's a white vinyl wrap over the whole car.

Reports suggest the Polo will be made locally in South Africa, but that can't explain why the steering wheel is on the left, which is wrong for the market. If this were a photo shoot car that just decided to take a sunny vacation before its reveal, it wouldn't have had steel rims.

Still, this gives us a pretty good idea of what the European model will look like. And it's an important debut we are talking about, as the Polo is among the Top 10 best sellers on the Old Continent.

Of course, the 2017 Polo will ride on the MQB A0 platform, just like the Ibiza. Even from these photos, we can easily tell that it's longer, wider and a little lower. These incremental changes will make it about the same size as the Golf 4 and a better choice for young families.

Reports have been all over the place when it comes to what's under the hood. The latest states that the engine range will go down from 14 to 12 versions, even though there are about 18 in Europe right now.

What we can say for sure is that about 50% of the sales should come from the 1.0 TSI. And because everybody is rolling with our idea that the GTI will use a 2-liter engine, we have the confidence to say something else: the 1.0 MPI base unit might be replaced by the 82 PS 1.0 TSI that's just been introduced on the Audi A1.

 
 
 
 
 

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