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2017 Chevrolet Bolt Platform Is So Unique GM Doesn’t Even Want to Talk About It

Even though General Motors had rolled out its Bolt electric vehicle a fair amount of time before Tesla Motors finished work on the Model 3, the automaker remains secretive about what makes the hatchback EV tick. To the point, the G2XX-derived platform.
2017 Chevrolet Bolt 51 photos
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But first, a quick rundown of the GM Gamma platform. As reported in our guide to General Motors platforms, the G2XX architecture is the latest development of the manufacturer’s small vehicle platform. Evolved from the original Gamma that appeared about 16 years ago, the G2XX will act as the backbone for the next-generation Chevrolet Sonic and Opel / Vauxhall Corsa F. While the outgoing Chevrolet Spark city car uses this platform, the Chevrolet Bolt doesn’t. Instead, it rides on an very modified version of it.

The secrets surrounding the Bolt’s underpinnings caught the attention of our friends over at Green Car Reports. As highlighted by them, the vehicle was architected, tested, and prototyped by GM, while LG offered its know-how for the battery pack, as well as plenty of electric and electronic components. But from here on in, puzzlement prevails.

As per the cited motoring publication, the Bolt ”was even said to have its own project code: G2KCZ. G2 for Gamma second-generation, K for hatchback, C for Chevrolet, and Z for electric car.” When GCR had emailed GM to ask about the accuracy of this project code, lead product engineer Josh Tavel replied that “there are no Bolt EV parts tied to the G2 architecture.” What’s more, GM is reluctant to tell what the Chevrolet Bolt’s platform is actually called.

After a bit of pressing, advanced tech team’s Kevin Kelly came clean about what’s lurking underneath: “The Bolt EV program originated on the Gamma architecture, but then grew into its own architecture - even as it maintained the G2 code.” Be that as it may, the Bolt can’t be had with adaptive cruise control, at least not for the model year 2017.

On the upside, the 2017 Chevrolet Bolt electric vehicle will be priced from $37,500 before incentives of up to $7,500. As if pricing wasn’t good enough, the EPA has rated the Bolt at 238 miles of range on a full charge. Not bad for a 60 kWh battery and for a vehicle of this size.

 
 
 
 
 

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