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2015 KTM Freeride E Is Ready to Electrify the Trails and the City

After a rather long wait, the KTM Freeride E looks like it will finally quietly make it to the showrooms in Europe. The electric dirt bike from Matighoffen took its time for arriving to the current shape, and certain aspects and features have been revised since its initial introduction as a concept, about 3 years ago.
KTM Freeride E 26 photos
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KTM will in fact be surfacing two versions of the Freeride E, the XC and SX, aiming at two kinds of riders. The XC is more suitable for the casual riders, beginner or more experienced ones, but who are no planning to compete in very serious conditions. Those who have a more pro-class approach to their riding should go for the SX, a machine engineered for closed track use, as opposed to the XC, which is delivered in a road-legal trim and can be lawfully used as a nifty urban commuter, as well.

The Freeride E is powered by a permanent magnet synchronous motor with liquid cooling and which can produce a maximum of 22 hp at 4,500 revs, and a max torque of 42Nm (30.9 lb-ft) straight from idle. Juice comes from a KTM-designed replaceable 2.6 kWh lithium-ion PowerPack battery, which takes 80 minutes for a full charge and 50 minutes for an 80% charging level. The normal charging current is 10A, while the quick-charging figure sees 13 Amps.

The frame is a perimeter steel-aluminium composite structure, with a high-strength polyamide and ABS plastic subframe, rolling with 43mm WP upside down forks and a WP PDS rear shock damper. The “giant rims” are a casual enduro combo, 21” in the front and 18” in the rear, with 260mm and 230mm rotors, respectively.

Freeride E arrives with a 910mm (35.8”) seat height and tips the scales at 106 kg (234 lb). The seat flips and riders can easily replace the power pack after unscrewing the 4 screws keeping it in place. Needless to say that buying more than one extra battery and bringing them to the track is the way to go, as the Freeride E will run for about one hour on a full charge… and this might not be enough.Price, availability and a Supermoto version rumored
The KTM Freeride E-XC will run you €11,398 ($14,695), while the SX will arrive with a €11,098 ($14,310) price tag, both prices being for the Austrian market. The Freeride E machines are most likely to be unveiled on German soil at the upcoming Intermot fair in Cologne, in early October.

So far it looks like only the Europeans will be able to enjoy KTM’s electric goodies, but the rumored Freeride E-SM supermoto beast could make it overseas. The Supermoto version of the Freeride E is said to be equipped with street rims, specific, sticky tires, bigger brake discs and upgraded, more powerful calipers. Enjoy Danny MacAskill Freeride E ambassador and his videos!

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