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2011 Volkswagen Eos Gets GTI Engine

Volkswagen’s Australian division announced that the 2011 model year is seeing the Eos receive an engine upgrade that is bringing the topless vehicle to the same power level as the famous Golf GTI.

The MY2011 Eos can now be ordered with the 2.0 liter Four-cylinder TSI petrol engine that delivers 211 hp and a peak torque of 280 Nm, which is delivered between 1,700 and 5,200 rpm. The engine can be mated to a six-speed manual gearbox or to a six-speed DSG double clutch automatic transmission. The unit’s CO2 emissions stand at 184 grams per km (DSG: 173 grams per km), while the fuel consumption is 7.9 liters per 100 km/29.8 mpg (DSG: 7.4 liters/31.8 mpg).

Other changes include the addition of standard Vienna leather upholstery with heated front seats, fresh 17-inch alloy rims and a range of new exterior colors that are combined with new chrome grille trips and cherry red taillights.

Manual transmission-equipped versions of the EOS now come with standard Hill Start Assist (HSA), which holds the vehicle when the foot brake is released by locking the brake pressure for a maximum of 1.5 seconds to provide comfortable starting-off. Hill Start Assist (HSA) operated in inclines greater than five percent.

The Eos is still available with a 2 liter four-cylinder diesel engine that delivers 140 hp and is mated to either a six-speed manual or to a six-speed DSG gearbox. This model is called Eos 103TDI.

The new Eos with the GTI engine (this is called 155TSI) has a starting price of AU$48,990, while other models in the range have kept their pricing unchanged. For example. the Eos 103TDI can be yours starting from AU$46,990.
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About the author: Andrei Tutu
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In his quest to bring you the most impressive automotive creations, Andrei relies on learning as a superpower. There's quite a bit of room in the garage that is this aficionado's heart, so factory-condition classics and widebody contraptions with turbos poking through the hood can peacefully coexist.
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