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1984 BMW R100RS Clad in Polaris Graphite Metallic Looks Great Despite Its Hefty Mileage

Folks tend to run away from hefty digits on the odo, yet mileage is a mere number when you’re talking about a well-maintained classic from BMW.
1984 BMW R100RS 27 photos
1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS1984 BMW R100RS
Featuring a gorgeous Polaris Graphite Metallic colorway, the 1984 BMW R100RS displayed in these photos had allegedly remained with the family of its original owner up until 2012. Even though it may not be in perfect shape, this classic sport-tourer looks surprisingly pristine for a bike that’s covered roughly 59k miles (95,000 km) since the day it left the factory.

As of 2018, the Bavarian was fitted with a 450-watt brushless charging system from EnDuraLast, while its dual carbs have been refurbished to keep things running smoothly. Fresh cylinder base O-rings and pushrod seals also make an appearance, along with new head and valve cover gaskets. Lastly, the brake master cylinders and front calipers were reconditioned right after the current owner’s acquisition.

Motorrad’s touring icon draws power from an air-cooled 980cc boxer-twin engine, bearing two valves per cylinder, 9.5:1 compression, and 40 mm (1.6-inch) Bing inhalers. When solicited, the four-stroke mill can spawn up to 70 ponies at 7,250 rpm and 56 pound-feet (76 Nm) of torque at 5,500 revs. This force is delivered to the rear shaft-driven wheel by a five-speed gearbox, which is coupled with a dry clutch.

Ultimately, the whole operation lets the R100RS go from zero to 62 mph (100 kph) in 4.6 seconds, before plateauing at a top speed of 124 mph (200 kph). For suspension-related affairs, responsibility is assigned to leading-axle telescopic forks and twin progressive shock absorbers. Stopping power comes from a trio of drilled 260 mm (10.2-inch) brake discs.

Last but not least, the Beemer weighs in at 506 pounds (230 kg) wet, and its fuel tank can hold 6.3 gallons (24 liters) of fossil syrup when full. This ‘84 MY specimen is currently offered at no reserve on Bring a Trailer, where you’ll find it listed until September 12! A total of four bidders have made an offer thus far, with the highest amounting to $4,500.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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