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1973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 Looks Like a Chicken Coop, Parked Outside for 42 Years

A 1973 Camaro Z/28 that spent no less than 42 years under the clear sky is now trying to get back on the road, obviously if someone is brave enough to start what looks like an insanely-difficult restoration process.
1973 Camaro Z/28 19 photos
1973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/281973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/281973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/281973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/281973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/281973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/281973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/281973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/281973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/281973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/281973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/281973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/281973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/281973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/281973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/281973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/281973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/281973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28
Listed online by eBay seller camillalsafa_0, this Camaro is a genuine Z/28, and the cowl tag, also included in one of the photos in our gallery, confirms this.

On the other hand, there’s good news and bad news on the engine front.

First and foremost, the seller claims this Camaro was born with a 350 (5.7-liter) engine under the hood, and the VIN code seems to confirm it. Beginning with the model year 1972, the Camaro VIN also includes engine information, and in the case of this rough example, it indicates the vehicle was fitted with the most powerful engine in the lineup.

The Chevrolet could be ordered with three versions of the 350 V8 in 1972, starting with the H-coded unit that developed 145 horsepower. The K-code Camaro was fitted with a 175-horsepower engine, while the 245-horsepower V8 was available on T-code models, including the ones we have here.

The photos pretty much speak for themselves and show the rough condition this Camaro struggles with after 42 years parked outside. From certain angles, the interior looks like it served as a chicken coop, with massive rust on the floors (the biggest part of them are gone anyway) and most likely everywhere else.

The seller acknowledges the car needs everything, and both the original engine and transmission are gone. In theory, this means you can very well go for a restomod, though not even such a project is going to be easy.

The seller is without a doubt very optimistic, as they enabled a starting bid of no less than $4,000. There’s also a reserve in place, but it remains to be seen if anyone is willing to pay a small fortune to give this Camaro a second chance.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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