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1972 GMC Custom Pickup Sells for More Than a 2021 Canyon

There are presently only two nameplates in the GMC lineup, the Yukon and the Canyon, each with its share of variants. Sometime this year, we expect the brand to adopt Hummer, turn it from the embodiment of gas-guzlling into a green electric vehicle, and unleash it into the world.
1972 GMC Custom Pickup 29 photos
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None of the vehicles GMC is fielding now or will field in the immediate future is custom material, or at least not the way we perceive that to be today. But there was a time when it made pickups that are just perfect for the job. They were, of course, slightly modified variants of the pickups GM sold under the Chevrolet brand, but that doesn’t make them any less appealing to the industry.

The one in the gallery above is a 1500 coming from 1972. That would make it part of the C/K series developed by Chevrolet, the one that is held is such high regard by custom shops. Only it’s nothing like it used to be, both in terms of looks and mechanical aspects.

Having gone through a major restoration no more than two years ago, the pickup is far from its former self. The entrails have been swapped for newer and better ones - Porterbuilt crossmembers and trailing arms, new front upper and lower A-arms – and so did the engine, which is now a 5.3-liter Vortec V8 mated to an automatic transmission.

The exterior, a Flame Red paint job, has been kept close to its original self, only smoothed and subtly modified to look more modern. The interior, sporting red and black, comes in Ostrich leather and features a chrome tilt steering column, Vintage Air, and a sound system packing two 12-inch subwoofers.

The pickup was on the lot of cars that sold during last week’s Barrett-Jackson auction. It went for $34,650, which is more than the price of a brand new Cayon.

 
 
 
 
 

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