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1972 Ford Mustang Parked in a Shed for 20 Years Can Still Be Saved

If you’re in the market looking for a Mustang that’s still in good shape for a restoration, the 1972 model we have here is without a doubt worth a look.
1972 Ford Mustang 19 photos
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It’s all because the car has been in storage for nearly two decades, with eBay seller sandralusk explaining the car doesn’t run, but “can still be saved with some work.

Judging by the photos included in the eBay listing, the car would indeed require plenty of work, not only under the hood but also inside. That's where several fixes are needed, especially if the future owner aims for is a full restoration to factory specifications.

The passenger seat, for example, requires major repairs, and the owner explains the floor pans would also need some patching. On the other hand, the body panels look straight and solid, while the frame is still in a good shape.

It's worth knowing that the hood itself comes with broken hinges, which is why it shows some damage here and there.

If you want to see the glass half-full, then it’s worth mentioning this Mustang still has the factory-installed 351 (5.75L) Cleveland under the hood. Mind you, the engine isn’t currently working; it can still be saved, the seller guarantees, though you should check this out more thoroughly before the purchase.

Other than that, you get power steering and air conditioning, although we’re not told if the latter still works. However, there’s a good chance it doesn’t, given the time spent in storage. No information has been provided on the mileage, but here comes the best part.

The Mustang can be yours for just $1,500, which is rather surprising considering that the car is not a total rust bucket and can still be saved. On the other hand, there’s a chance the owner wanted to list the Mustang for auction (not with a fixed price), and $1,500 was only the starting bid. You can see the car in person in Stantonville, Tennessee.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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