autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 

1972 Dodge Charger SE Recovered From a Salvage Yard, Looks Like It Deserves a Better Life

The Rallye was one of the biggest stars of the Charger show back in 1972, and the production numbers pretty much speak for themselves.
1972 Charger SE 13 photos
1972 Dodge Charger SE1972 Dodge Charger SE1972 Dodge Charger SE1972 Dodge Charger SE1972 Dodge Charger SE1972 Dodge Charger SE1972 Dodge Charger SE1972 Dodge Charger SE1972 Dodge Charger SE1972 Dodge Charger SE1972 Dodge Charger SE1972 Dodge Charger SE
Out of the more than 75,600 units produced for this model year, only a little over 4,350 used the Rallye package. On the other hand, this doesn’t necessarily mean the other Charger versions could just be ignored.

And the Charger SE that someone has recently published on eBay is just living proof in this regard.

While the vehicle looks rather solid in the photos shared by seller recharged, there’s something you need to know about this Charger. It was recovered from a salvage yard, so everything could have been much worse.

Truth be told, this Charger isn’t by any means close to the rust bucket condition you’d normally expect when hearing about a salvage yard, and based on the provided images, it seems to be a project that totally deserves a better life.

The body looks in a decent shape, but several important parts seem to be missing, including the wheels. The interior would require a lot of work to get back to a good shape, and the trunk seems to exhibit only surface rust – in theory, this should be easy to fix during a full restoration process, as no patching seems to be required.

The Charger no longer comes with an engine and a transmission, and this means it’s more of a restomod candidate rather than a Dodge that could fit a full restoration to factory specifications.

In other words, you could very well install a more powerful engine in the car and create a monster Charger that would eventually become a head-turning machine in all regards.

Until this happens, however, someone must be willing to pay the hefty price the seller is expecting to get. The car is ready to go for $4,650, and no other offers seem to be accepted.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories