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1971 Porsche 911 T With Gulf-Liveried Super Wide RSR Body Kit Is All Show

Porsche purists will probably agree that every 911 is an automotive legend, no matter the era it was built or how many modifications have been done to it.
1971 Porsche 911 T widebody 29 photos
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Hopefully, the following 911 T and its humongous wide body kit will have those Porsche aficionados respect it just as much as a completely original one, because some people will probably not.

Not to make a huge fuss about it, but under those gargantuan fiberglass RSR parts there isn't a 1,000+ horsepower turbocharged engine like some would expect, but a measly 2.2-liter naturally aspirated flat-six.

Sure, it has had some performance parts fitted to it, including a new suspension and a better wheel and tire combo, but that superhero mantle hides a fit Bruce Wayne, not Batman.

It’s the exquisite-looking Gulf livery that draws the most attention, followed closely by the body kit, but don’t think for a minute that this 1971 Porsche 911 T is ‘all show and no go.’

Originally an Irish Green example of Neunelfer legacy, the car was repainted, and its engine was overhauled in 2017 and had a tune-up in fall 2020.

The 2.2-liter flat-six is original and gets its food through dual Zenith carburetors, sending all of its 130-140 horsepower to the rear wheels thanks to a four-speed manual transmission.

The 2017 overhaul apparently included a valve and camshafts replacement, new seals and timing chains, while another service visit in 2019 saw the flat-six get new piston rings, an MSD ignition box and blaster coil, as well as a new alternator and integrated regulator.

In other words, there’s reason to believe that the car drives just fine despite being 50 years old. It’s currently for sale by a dealership that is asking a cool $69,979 for the privilege of owning it.

Despite not having the most powerful Boxer engine ever, we think it looks cool enough to drop a lot of jaws even in a sea of RWB-tuned widebodies, of which some are also trying a bit too hard.

 
 
 
 
 

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