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1971 Plymouth Duster 340 Is a Barn Find That’s Not Telling the Whole Story

Produced for just six years, between 1970 and 1976, the Plymouth Duster is still a very sought-after model in the restoration business.
1971 Plymouth Duster 24 photos
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Of course, not too many of them ended up seeing the daylight, and in 1971, for instance, Plymouth produced close to 186,500 units.

One of the most appealing versions, however, was the Duster 340, whose performance reached 275 horsepower for this model year (the output was eventually dropped to 245 horsepower a year later because of a compression ratio change).

Some 12,800 Dusters ended up rolling off the assembly lines in 1971 with a 340 under the hood. And one of them has recently been pulled from a barn and is now fighting for a second chance.

Unfortunately, eBay seller filtex hasn’t provided too many specifics on the barn find bit, so we don’t know how many years the car has spent in hiding. What we do know, however, is that the original engine is still under the hood. It’s not locked up from sitting, but it may require some fixes before starting.

The provided photos seem to suggest that not all metal is original, and the seller themselves claims there’s a chance the car was once orange. In other words, not only the Duster has already been repainted, but certain panels have most likely been replaced, possibly because of rust issues.

At first glance, however, this Duster looks to be an intriguing restoration candidate, but given that so many essential tidbits are missing, interested buyers are strongly recommended to go check it out in person. The car is parked in Albertville, Alabama.

Sold as part of a no-reserve auction, which means the highest bidder can take it home, the Duster seems to have a hard time catching the attention of netizens. This is mostly because of the starting bid, as the owner expects to get at least $5,000 for the car.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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