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1971 Plymouth Barracuda Spent 35 Years in a Storage Container, and It Shows

The Plymouth Barracuda is one of those cars that are very sought after in the custom industry. Belonging to a brand name that has been long ago killed by economic interests, Cudas made during the decade that started in 1964 keep popping up at various auctions and on websites, selling for big bucks, regardless of their condition.
1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible 23 photos
1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible
Among the rarest Barracudas are the convertibles. This body style was phased out by Plymouth three years before the nameplate was discontinued altogether, in 1971, making the under 20 such Cudas extremely difficult to find, and as result extremely valuable.

Of the 17 or so convertible Cudas made in 1971, two are on sale in May during the Mecum Indianapolis auction. The first is the restored Curious Yellow one we already talked about, and the second the not-so-glamorous Tor Red one we have here.

The car we have in the gallery above is one of the just two that were specced for markets outside the U.S. For some reason, someone somewhere lost track of it, and the car spent about 35 years in a storage container.

The decades spent unused show on the car’s body, but that is not necessarily a bad thing. The original body panels are all there – except for the Shaker hood that was added after the car was rescued – as is the original, multi-carburated 440ci (7.2-liter) V8 powerplant linked to an automatic transmission, both slightly refreshed several years ago.

There are only minor changes made to the vehicle compared to how it presented itself decades ago, and they include the Rallye wheels and upgraded radial tires.

There is no estimate as to how much this Barracuda convertible is expected to fetch at the auction, but we do expect to see it sometime in the future coming back as either a clean restoration, or some crazy rebuild.

Editor's note: The Indianapolis auction has been postponed to June on account of the coronavirus pandemic.

 
 
 
 
 

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