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1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger With Matching Numbers Is the Portrayal of Old-School Cool

It looks perfectly fit for a refined gentleman with great taste and a soft spot for classic paraphernalia.
1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger 20 photos
1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger1970 Triumph TR6R Tiger
The Triumph TR6R Tiger is put in motion thanks to an air-cooled 649cc parallel-twin engine, which breathes through Amal carburetion hardware. At about 6,500 revs per minute, the four-stroke mill is able to deliver 42 English thoroughbreds, while a peak torque output of 37 pound-feet (50 Nm) will be spawned at 5,500 spins.

A four-speed gearbox connects the Tiger’s powerplant to its rear 18-inch wheel, and it’s accompanied by a wet multi-plate clutch. The engine’s oomph motivates a dry weight of 386 pounds (175 kg), with the end result being a top speed of 105 mph (170 kph). For stopping power, the classic gem relies on a vented twin-leading shoe drum brake up front and a single-leading shoe unit down south.

Triumph’s head-turner is built using a semi-double cradle frame, which rests on telescopic forks and twin preload-adjustable shocks. Above these paragraphs, you may see a 1970 model that’s been subjected to an extensive refurbishment under current ownership. During the overhaul, the bike was fitted with a Boyer Bransden electronic ignition, youthful petcocks and a replacement Amal carburetor.

Furthermore, its forks were treated to fresh rubber gaiters and seals, while the wheels have been wrapped in Dunlop Gold Seal K70 rubber. To keep things looking as neat as possible, the TR6R’s owner had its OEM saddle removed in favor of a modern vinyl-clad substitute. Lastly, a newer Smiths speedometer can be seen taking pride of place in the cockpit area.

This well-kept ‘70 MY relic is making its way to the auction block at no reserve on the BaT (Bring a Trailer) website, and the highest bid ranks at $4,000 for the time being. There are less than 24 hours separating us from the auctioning deadline, so make sure you act quickly if you’d like to try snatching the old-school British pearl.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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