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1970 Ford Mustang Off the Road for 40 Years Looks Ready for a Restomod

A 1970 Ford Mustang fastback is now hoping for a second chance as part of an online auction, all after spending over 4 decades on the side of the road.
1970 Ford Mustang 14 photos
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As you can easily guess, given it’s a car that’s been sitting for so long, this Mustang doesn’t flex a mint condition, but the good news is that it checks the essential boxes for a restomod.

In case you’re wondering why a restomod and not a full restoration, the answer is as simple as it could be: this Mustang was born with a six-cylinder unit under the hood, and while the engine is still around, it’s currently locked up from sitting.

The six-cylinder available on the 1970 Mustang was a 200 (3.3-liter) Thriftpower developing 120 horsepower, but at the same time, some units also came equipped with a 250 (4.1-liter) inherited from the model year 1969. This unit produced 155 horsepower on both model years.

You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to figure out this Mustang needs plenty of work to return to a mint condition. But eBay seller pistolgrip_70 says the car was born and raised in Texas, so you don’t need to worry about salty roads and high humidity. In other words, the rust shouldn’t be a critical issue, though there’s some on the floor pans.

The seller claims the Mustang is 100 percent, as nothing big is missing, and without a doubt, this is terrific news for someone who is willing to bring it back to the road.

The VIN decodes to a 2-door Mustang that was painted in Light Ivy yellow, so in theory, the original finish might still be on the car.

The bidding for this Mustang starts at $8,000, and this might be quite a problem. Given it’s a six-cylinder example with the engine already locked up, someone planning a full restoration might not be willing to pay that much, so it’ll certainly be interesting to see how high the price ends up going.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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