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1970 Ford Mustang Mach 1 Sitting for Many Years Comes with Two Engines, Still Not Running

The engine lineup for the 1970 Mustang started with the new 200 (3.3-liter) Thriftpower six-cylinder, which developed a little over 120 horsepower, and continued with the 250 (4.1-liter) unit that was pretty much the same as on the 1969 model.
1970 Mustang Mach 1 25 photos
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As far as V8s are concerned, customers could order the 302 (4.9-liter) small-block, the new 351 (5.8-liter) Cleveland in either 2-barrel or 4-barrel configuration, as well as the 429 (7.9-liter) on the Boss model.

The Mustang that we have here comes not with one, but with two different engines, yet somehow, the car still isn’t running. This is because the vehicle has been sitting for a long time, and this is pretty much obvious if you check out the photos in the gallery.

This Mustang has clearly seen better days, and it currently comes with a mix of original parts and goodies borrowed from other models. For example, the front seats were initially installed on a 1969 Mustang, and the hood has been replaced with an aftermarket version that also displays some damage as well.

As far as the two engines are concerned, the one under the hood is a 351 Windsor 2-barrel, obviously borrowed from a 1969 Mustang as well. However, there’s also a 351 Cleveland 4-barrel inside the car, and eBay seller rickfordboss claims they’ve been told this one “is good.”

Of course, given the car has been sitting for a while and many original parts are missing, a thorough inspection of everything is definitely recommended, especially because you first need to figure out if any of the two engines can still run or not.

If anything, this Mustang is a worthy candidate for a restomod, as bringing it back to factory specifications seems quite a challenge given some stock parts are gone, the overall condition isn’t necessarily the best, and the correct engine is missing.

The no-reserve auction has received just a single bid so far, as someone is willing to pay $8,500 for it.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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