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1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 Shows Beautiful Patina, Has Only 22,863 Miles

Carroll Shelby was looking to take a little break from high-performance cars at the end of the 1960s, and this left the peeps at Ford without a track-focused pony car. Ford Motor needed a replacement for the GT350R in SCCA racing, and the inevitable happened in the guise of the Boss 302 that reclaimed the Trans-Am title from the Golden Bowtie in 1970.
1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor 27 photos
1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 survivor
Former GM vice president Bunkie Knudsen and former GM designer Larry Shinoda are the masterminds of the homologation special that was designed in accordance with the “race on Sunday, sell on Monday” mantra. The centerpiece of the Boss 302 is the high-performance motor with thin-wall casing. Considerably different from regular 302s, the high-performance mill is instantly recognizable thanks to the cranky solid-lifter camshaft.

Chassis number 0F02G157357 features the legendary engine with 290 horsepower and 290 pound-feet (393 Nm) of torque, and it’s irresistible because of the odometer reading. The 1970 model offered by GR Auto Gallery has been driven only 22,863 miles (36,794 kilometers) thus far, and it hasn’t been taken apart since rolling out of the factory in January of 1970.

Offered for a whopping $119,900 after sitting in a garage for the past three years, the small-blocked pony shows a few paint imperfections in the period-correct blue metallic. The underside and bottom of the engine have seen better days too, but all in all, this car is a survivor through and through.

One of 4,607 units produced with the Boss 302 engine and Toploader manual transmission, the 1970 model is optioned with blue vinyl-wrapped bucket seats, the 3.50 rear axle, Traction-Lok differential, rear deck spoiler, F60-15 white-letter tires, Shaker hood, AM radio, and Magnum 500 wheels.

In addition to the vehicle, the sale further includes the original spare tire, jack and jack handle, build sheet, and a Marti report for extra peace of mind.



Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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