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1969 Ford Mustang Sitting on a Farm Hides the Body Style Code Everybody Is Drooling Over

As if the 1969 Mustang itself wasn’t necessarily a pretty intriguing find anyway, this example that was recently discovered on a farm comes with something that makes it ten times more enticing.
1969 Mustang Mach 1 25 photos
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The body style code is 63C, which means it’s a genuine Mustang Mach 1, therefore ticking 99 percent of the boxes for a very, very appealing restoration candidate.

It makes little sense to discuss why the Mach 1 is such a successful model, but worth reminding is that its introduction also represented the end of the GT. Due to the poor sales in 1969 (Ford only shipped approximately 5,400 GTs), Ford decided to drop it completely, therefore going all-in on the Mach 1. As a result, its production got close to 72,500 units only in the first year on the market.

And now, the good news.

The 1969 Mustang that someone has recently listed on eBay comes with the body style code that was warranted specifically to the Mach 1 – 63C, and it’s clearly visible on the door data plate.

Seller logisticnorth says the car was sitting on a farm for a very long time, so it goes without saying it doesn’t come in its best shape. But the bad news comes from what’s under the hood – or better said, what’s no longer under the hood. The engine is missing, and so is the transmission.

In other words, this Mach 1 is a roller, but on the other hand, the seller claims there are lots of options you’re going to get, including air conditioning.

Now let’s talk money.

The car is listed with a fixed price, so whoever wants to take it home must pay $10,000. Fortunately, the Make Offer button has also been enabled, so if you have another deal in mind, just make sure you reach out to the seller.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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