autoevolution
 

1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible Mixes a Mysterious Engine With Barn Rust

While most people believe the 1968 Pontiac GTO is much cooler than the 1967 sibling, there's no doubt the latter still has that special je ne sais quoi that makes petrolheads drool over an all-original example.
1967 GTO needs to be saved 24 photos
Photo: Bogdan Popa/autoevolution/eBay seller bearbuyerk
1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible
The new taillights, the chrome grill, and the engine upgrades more or less paved the way for the second-generation GTO that debuted a year later with much fanfare, eventually pushing the sales to new records.

The GTO that I recently discovered on eBay is here to show the world that the 1967 model year deserves our love too.

Recently pulled from a barn, the car still looks restorable, especially as the rust hasn’t yet transformed the GTO into a complete wreck. Don't get me wrong, there's plenty of rust on this Pontiac, but everything looks restorable in the photos shared by eBay seller bearbuyerk.

Sure enough, the best way to determine its condition is to go check out everything in person, and I truly suggest you do this. The floors, for instance, seem rusty, but without a visual inspection, it's hard to tell if new ones are required or if regular patches would do it.

The convertible obviously requires many fixes, but let's stop for a minute at what's hiding under the hood. Powered by a 400 V8 producing 360 horsepower, this GTO still runs, though you obviously shouldn’t consider it road-worthy.

The owner says it's a Tri-Power configuration, but this claim makes the listing a bit confusing. The 1967 GTO dropped the Tri-Power for Quadrajet four-barrel carbs, so maybe the engine has already been replaced with a 1966 unit? I believe the Tri-Power reference is just an error, as the engine displacement and power output are correct – the 1967 GTO fitted with the HO option indeed produced 360 horsepower thanks to the 400 engine.

At the end of the day, this GTO is certainly intriguing and worth checking out, especially if you're specifically interested in restoring it to factory specifications. And speaking of the restoration, the owner says extra parts are also included, so in theory, getting the car back on the road might not be as hard as it looks at first glance.

The auction is already underway, and the only bid submitted at the time of writing brought the price to $6,000. The owner hasn't configured a reserve, so unless someone sends a higher bid, the lucky man who spotted this GTO will take the car home. The vehicle is parked in Pennsylvania, and as I said, checking out everything in person is highly recommended. The auction is set to expire in approximately one week, so reach out to the seller for more information and a possible visit to see the GTO live.
If you liked the article, please follow us:  Google News icon Google News Youtube Instagram X (Twitter)
About the author: Bogdan Popa
Bogdan Popa profile photo

Bogdan keeps an eye on how technology is taking over the car world. His long-term goals are buying an 18-wheeler because he needs more space for his kid’s toys, and convincing Google and Apple that Android Auto and CarPlay deserve at least as much attention as their phones.
Full profile

 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories