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1967 Ford Mustang GT Tucked Away in a Garage for Years Isn’t a Typical Barn Find

Way too many cars found in barns after years of sitting come in a very rough shape, so their restoration is a very challenging process that many people just don’t want to get involved in.
1967 Ford Mustang 23 photos
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This Ford Mustang clearly isn’t the typical barn find, pretty much because it comes in an impressive condition after being tucked away in a garage for years. On the other hand, this doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a perfect-10, so it still requires some TLC before it can become the shiny pony that everybody loves.

Let’s start with the essential tidbits.

The engine lineup in 1967 started with the 200 (3.3-liter) six-cylinder developing 120 horsepower and continued with the 289 (4.7-liter) in either 2-barrel or 4-barrel configurations. A 390 (6.4-liter) V8 was also available on the S-code Mustang, producing no more, no less than 320 horsepower thanks to a 4-barrel carburetor.

A 2-barrel version of the same unit was introduced exclusively for the model year 1968.

As a GT, this Mustang convertible was born with a 289 under the hood, and thanks to a new 4-barrel carburetor, it now runs just like new. Oldman Classics, the garage in charge of finding a new owner for the car and going by the name of oldmanclassicmustangsintexas on eBay, says some other fixes have also been made, including a new gas tank, a new fuel pump, and a new battery.

It’s not a surprise that many people are trying to get their hands on this complete and unrestored gem, especially given its solid condition outside, inside, and under the hood.

However, while the top bid already exceeds $10,000, the reserve is yet to be triggered, so interested buyers must do better if they really want the Mustang. The auction is scheduled to end in some 4 days, so it remains to be seen if anyone manages to unlock the reserve.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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