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1966 Ford Mustang Survives Years of Sitting, Ticks All the Right Boxes

The year was 1966, and the Ford Mustang was already a model whose popularity was skyrocketing. Living proof is none other than the convertible version of the pony, as it became the number one car with this body style in the United States in 1966.
1966 Ford Mustang 21 photos
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Its sales exceeded 72,000 units, managing to beat the runner-up Impala with almost double the performance of the famous Chevy.

When it comes to engines, the Mustang was offered with the same choices as the model it replaced. Standard this year was the 200 (3.3-liter) with 120 horsepower, while the base V8 was the 289 (4.7-liter) with a 2-barrel carburetor and rated at 200 horsepower.

More powerful versions, however, were also offered. A 4-barrel sibling of the same unit produced 225 horsepower, while the HiPo configuration generated 270 horsepower.

The C-code Mustang that was posted on eBay by seller ramosyards18 is one of the examples that saw daylight back in 1966, and the good news is that it continues to exhibit a rather solid shape today. It does exhibit rust in the typical places, including on the floors, but this isn’t necessarily a surprise anyway.

The owner says the car has spent a very long time sitting in their garage, so it’s a project that’s been waiting for a full restoration for quite a while.

A video presentation of the project confirms the metal is generally solid, but of course, an in-person inspection is still recommended if you’re truly interested in giving the car a full restoration to factory specifications.

Worth knowing, however, is that the car isn’t being sold as part of an auction but comes with a fixed price. Anyone willing to save this pony must pay $5,000, and at first glance, it doesn’t look like the owner is interested in any other deals or offers.

The vehicle is currently located in Vallejo, California.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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