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1966 Ford Mustang Parked for 32 Years Proves American Legends Never Die

Rust is the worst thing that can happen to a car, and needless to say, it mostly occurs when the car sits for too long in improper conditions.
Ford Mustang parked for 32 years 21 photos
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That is why many of the barn finds we come across don’t bring back cars in mint condition but as rust buckets that require intensive work, not necessarily to make them shine like a diamond but to at least get them back on the road.

The Mustang that we have here is the living confirmation that an American icon can survive for a long time in storage as long as it doesn’t have to deal with rain, snow, or high humidity in general. Parked inside for 32 years, this 1966 Mustang comes with just a little rust on the driver’s door, but other than that, the body overall looks pretty solid.

eBay seller crazyguy57 claims the car no longer runs because it’s been sitting for so long, and whoever buys it would have to replace all the hoses and find a new fuel tank. There’s no rust on the floor pans and under the car, so if you’re planning a full restoration or a restomod, this Mustang certainly looks like a good candidate.

A restomod might actually be a better idea than a standard restoration to factory specifications anyway. This Mustang was originally a straight-six and came with an automatic transmission, and while we don’t know if the engine under the hood is the original one or not, the mileage isn’t necessarily the lowest either.

The odometer indicates 174,470 miles (280,782 kilometers), according to the listing.

The auction for this Mustang is set to come to an end in less than 24 hours. While at first glance the $30,000 starting price sounds way too ambitious, it looks like someone already agreed to pay this price, so there’s a chance the car would find a new owner in rather sooner than later.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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