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1966 Ford Mustang Hopes a Few Rust Holes Won’t Scare You Away, Mysterious Engine

The 1966 Mustang engine lineup was almost identical to the one offered to customers in 1965, so the standard unit was the same 200 (3.3-liter) Thriftpower six-cylinder developing 120 horsepower.
1966 Ford Mustang 19 photos
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The available V8 options included several versions of the 289 (4.3-liter) Windsor, starting with a 2-barrel unit developing 200 horsepower. The 4-barrel offered on this model year was rated at 225 horsepower, while the top-of-the-line was the Windsor HiPo and generating 270 horsepower.

The Mustang that we have here also flexes a 289 under the hood, though on the other, its condition is as mysterious as it gets.

We have no clue if the engine is still the original one that came with the car, and we don’t know if it can be saved either. eBay user i*find*u*flip, who typically sells project cars pulled from barns, says the 289 could every well be locked up from sitting, but right now, the condition of the engine is uncertain.

What we do know is that the car isn’t running, so it clearly requires some work on this front.

As for the overall shape of this Ford Mustang, you don’t have to be a rocket scientist to tell the car needs plenty of metalwork to return to the road. There are several holes in the floors, though at a quick glance, there’s nothing that some good patching wouldn’t be able to fix.

Without a doubt, while this Mustang looks like it’s worth a full restoration, the car comes as a very challenging project car, and this is why it should go for cheap. The bidding is currently under way, and no less than 20 people are currently fighting to get the car home.

The top offer at the time of writing is a little over $2,300, but this still isn’t enough to trigger the reserve. If you want to buy the Mustang without a fight, be ready to spend $4,400.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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