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1966 Ford Mustang Barn Find Looks Impressive for a Car Sitting for Years

Just like its predecessor, the 1966 Mustang was offered with a 200 (3.3-liter) six-cylinder as standard. This engine was specifically introduced in 1965 to replace the original 170 (2.8-liter) Thriftpower six-cylinder, and with 120 horsepower, its role was more than obvious.
1966 Ford Mustang 17 photos
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Customers who didn’t care about performance were specifically targeted by this grocery-getter configuration, while everybody else could choose from several other V8 options in the lineup.

The 289 (4.7-liter) small-block was offered with both 2-barrel and 4-barrel carburetors, and the power output reached 200 and 225 horsepower, respectively.

The top unit in 1965 and 1966 was the 289 HiPo fitted with a 4-barrel unit, and this time, the power rating was increased to 271 horsepower.

The Mustang someone has recently published on Craigslist is equipped with a 289 powerplant as well, though, on the other hand, we have no clue if it’s still running or not.

This is because the car has been parked for over a decade, with the seller explaining it’s a genuine barn find in all regards. While no further specifics have been offered on where the vehicle was stored, the shared photos seem to indicate this Mustang looks really great, despite the many years in storage.

Both the exterior and the interior seem in very good shape, though this doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a perfect 10. It’s not, and the seller themselves claim some fixes are required, including a new gas tank, a new radiator, and new brakes.

But at the end of the day, this Ford Mustang flexes a condition that you can hardly find these days. We don’t know how original everything on this car continues to be, but a live inspection should help any interested buyer figure this out on their own.

The seller claims they want to find a new owner really fast, so the asking price is $11,500. No other deals are accepted.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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