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1964 Chevrolet Bel Air Is Ready to Become an Impala, Good News Under the Hood

The Impala was Chevrolet’s superstar during the ‘60s, and needless to say, this made other models, such as the Bel Air, more or less become second-class citizens of the GM brand’s car portfolio.
1964 Chevrolet Bel Air 15 photos
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Given the similarities between the Bel Air and the Impala, however, both are very desirable cars today, especially when it comes to projects that need to be restored.

This 1964 Bel Air right here, for instance, would make for an excellent Impala clone, especially thanks to its solid condition overall.

The photos are worth a thousand words, and they do show that the Bel Air managed to deal with the test of time in a pretty remarkable manner. The rust hasn’t yet wrecked the metal, though there’s one small hole in the back left of the floor pan, and whoever buys the car should take care of it first thing before beginning the restoration.

Now let’s talk about what’s happening under the hood.

If you’re interested in converting this Bel Air into an Impala, you may not be happy to hear that the engine in charge of putting the wheels in motion is the original six-cylinder unit that came with the car.

On the other hand, if you want to use this Bel Air as a daily driver, then you should be happy to learn that the engine still runs – eBay seller kung_foo_rick says they haven’t tried to start it, though, but they’re confident everything is working as expected.

At the end of the day, this 1964 Bel Air is undoubtedly worth a look, not necessarily for restoring to factory specifications but also for a restomod. With the right engine and the proper fixes, this Bel Air could become a head-turning machine that would cost a lot more than it does now.

The top offer at the time of writing is a little over $2,000, but the reserve is yet to be met.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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