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1962 Pontiac Grand Prix Flexes Highly Desirable Engine Option, Rare Factory Correction

A first-year Pontiac Grand Prix that looks like it’s been sitting for many years, waiting for restoration, hopes it would eventually receive the highly anticipated overhaul after showing up on eBay.
1962 Pontiac Grand Prix 22 photos
Photo: Bogdan Popa/autoevolution/eBay seller dualquaddave77
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The car checks many boxes for a restoration candidate while also coming with rare goodies, including a factory correction you don't see daily.

1962 was the year when the Grand Prix came to be based on the Catalina coupe platform. Its focus was to deliver a thrilling experience behind the wheel, and the performance appetite was fueled by hefty engines, beginning with the 389 unit donated by the Bonneville and rated at 303 horsepower. The Tri-Power carburetor setup received much love thanks to its 318 horsepower, but Pontiac also offered several other high-performance units, including a 348-horsepower Tri-Power configuration.

The icing on the cake was the much rarer street version of the 421 Pontiac, which came with a 421 Super Duty engine and two four-barrel carburetors for a power rating of 405 horsepower.

The Grand Prix listed on eBay by seller dualquaddave77 comes with a 389 Tri-Power setup paired with a 4-speed transmission. As if the Tri-Power magic wasn't enough, the car also flexes a factory correction you don't see too often.

The body stamp shows the 10B code, meaning the vehicle was fitted with a 3-speed transmission. The code was corrected right from the factory, with Pontiac's engineers adding the C letter on top of it to transform it to 10C – indicating a 4-speed transmission.

The transmission remains intact, but the Tri-Power setup is no longer in the car. You're getting many other original goodies, including the factory console tach, the shifter, the pedals, and the steering column.

The photos speak for themselves and indicate this Grand Prix won't be an easy project. It's missing some parts, including the Tri-Power, the front fenders, the grille, and the hood, but the seller says they can help the buyer find everything if they're interested in a complete restoration.

The interior looks better than I expected, with almost everything in person and the seats not exhibiting any concerning problem, aside from the typical dirt. The best way to understand the coolness of this Grand Prix is to see it in person, and you must travel to Florida for an in-person inspection.

The selling price might be a roadblock for the car's highly desirable return to the road. The owner wants around $8,900 for the car, but they also accept other offers if someone is interested in saving the Grand Prix. Restoring the car isn't for the faint of heart, but with the right work, it could end up costing ten times more, especially for a collector who wants a truly rare gem.
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About the author: Bogdan Popa
Bogdan Popa profile photo

Bogdan keeps an eye on how technology is taking over the car world. His long-term goals are buying an 18-wheeler because he needs more space for his kid’s toys, and convincing Google and Apple that Android Auto and CarPlay deserve at least as much attention as their phones.
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